Y Chromosome Infertility

Common Name(s)

Y Chromosome Infertility

Description for this condition is not yet available.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Y Chromosome Infertility" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Y Chromosome Infertility" returned 16 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Polymorphisms of KITLG, SPRY4, and BAK1 genes in patients with testicular germ cell tumors and individuals with infertility associated with AZFc deletion of the Y chromosome].
 

Author(s): M V Nemtsova, E V Ivkin, O A Simonova, V V Rudenko, V B Chernykh, D S Mikhaylenko, O B Loran

Journal: Mol. Biol. (Mosk.). ;50(6):960-967.

 

Testicular cancer is the most common form of solid cancer in young men. Testicular cancer is represented by testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) derived from embryonic stem cells with different degrees of differentiation in about 95% of cases. The development of these tumors is related ...

Last Updated: 8 Jan 2017

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Correlation between Y chromosome microdeletion and male infertility.
 

Author(s): X G Liu, H Y Hu, Y H Guo, Y P Sun

Journal:

 

Dyszoospermia due to genetic factors is the leading cause of male infertility. To explore the correlation between azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletion of the Y chromosome and male infertility, we evaluated AZF microdeletion on the long arm of the Y chromosome in 166 infertile males ...

Last Updated: 21 Jun 2016

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Gr/gr deletions on Y-chromosome correlate with male infertility: an original study, meta-analyses, and trial sequential analyses.
 

Author(s): Sandeep Kumar Bansal, Deepika Jaiswal, Nishi Gupta, Kiran Singh, Rima Dada, Satya Narayan Sankhwar, Gopal Gupta, Singh Rajender

Journal:

 

We analyzed the AZFc region of the Y-chromosome for complete (b2/b4) and distinct partial deletions (gr/gr, b1/b3, b2/b3) in 822 infertile and 225 proven fertile men. We observed complete AZFc deletions in 0.97% and partial deletions in 6.20% of the cases. Among partial deletions, ...

Last Updated: 15 Feb 2016

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Y Chromosome Infertility" returned 9 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The AZFc region of the Y chromosome: at the crossroads between genetic diversity and male infertility.
 

Author(s): Paulo Navarro-Costa, João Gonçalves, Carlos E Plancha

Journal: Hum. Reprod. Update. ;16(5):525-42.

 

The three azoospermia factor (AZF) regions of the Y chromosome represent genomic niches for spermatogenesis genes. Yet, the most distal region, AZFc, is a major generator of large-scale variation in the human genome. Determining to what extent this variability affects spermatogenesis ...

Last Updated: 10 Aug 2010

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Genetic markers of male infertility: Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance gene mutations.
 

Author(s): J Sertić, P Cvitković, A Myers, R K Saiki, A Stavljenić Rukavina

Journal: Croat. Med. J.. 2001 Aug;42(4):416-20.

 

Today, approximately 15% of couples have reduced fertility. In most cases the reason is male infertility, usually of genetic origin. Thus, in the context of research in genes involved in reproduction and sex determination, genetic defects in gametogenesis are being extensively studied. ...

Last Updated: 25 Jul 2001

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Microdeletions on the long arm of the Y chromosome and their association with male-factor infertility.
 

Author(s): C Briton-Jones, C J Haines

Journal: Hong Kong Med J. 2000 Jun;6(2):184-9.

 

Significant advances in treatment have enabled previously infertile males to achieve fatherhood, when only a few years ago they would have had no chance of biological paternity. In contrast to the overall success of assisted reproduction, the aetiology of male-factor infertility is ...

Last Updated: 1 Sep 2000

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.