Chlamydia

Common Name(s)

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can infect men and women. Chlamydia can do serious and permanent damage to a women's reproductive system, making it very difficult to get pregnant or have a healthy pregnancy. Symptoms in women include abnormal vaginal discharge and a burning feeling when urinating. Men with chlamydia may experience a discharge from their penis, a burning feeling when urinating, or pain and swelling in one or both testicles. Chlamydia is spread by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone with chlamydia. Chlamydia can also be passed from a pregnant mother to her newborn during childbirth. The only true way of avoiding chlamydia is by not having vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Using latex condoms while having vaginal, anal, or oral sex can greatly decrease your chances of getting chlamydia. Being in a monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested for STDs and has received results confirming they do not have chlamydia, is also another way to avoid getting the disease. Chlamydia can be cured with proper medication prescribed by your doctor. See your doctor if you think you may have chlamydia.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Chlamydia" for support, advocacy or research.

HealthyWomen

HealthyWomen (HW) is the nation's leading independent health information source for women. Our core mission is to educate, inform and empower women to make smart health choices for themselves and their families. For more than 20 years, millions of women have been coming to HW for answers to their most pressing and personal health care questions. Through our wide array of online and print publications, HW provides health information that is original, objective, reviewed by medical experts and reflective of the advances in evidence-based health research.

Last Updated: 9 Jul 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Chlamydia" for support, advocacy or research.

HealthyWomen

HealthyWomen (HW) is the nation's leading independent health information source for women. Our core mission is to educate, inform and empower women to make smart health choices for themselves and their families. For more than 20 years, millions of women have been coming to HW for answers to their most pressing and personal health care questions. Through our wide array of online and print publications, HW provides health information that is original, objective, reviewed by medical experts and reflective of the advances in evidence-based health research.

http://www.healthywomen.org

Last Updated: 9 Jul 2015

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Chlamydia" returned 3019 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Opportunistic testing for urogenital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in south-western Switzerland, 2012: a feasibility study.
 

Author(s): F Bally, A Quach, G Greub, K Jaton, C Petignat, C Ambord, J Fellay, E Masserey, B Spencer

Journal:

 

The feasibility of opportunistic screening of urogenital infections with Chlamydia trachomatis was assessed in a cross-sectional study in 2012, in two cantons of south-western Switzerland: Vaud and Valais. Sexually active persons younger than 30 years, not tested for C. trachomatis ...

Last Updated: 13 Mar 2015

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[Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and factors with the risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections in college students].
 

Author(s): Marcelo Occhionero, Laura Paniccia, Dina Pedersen, Gabriela Rossi, Héctor Mazzucchini, Andrea Entrocassi, Lucia Gallo Vaulet, Valeria Gualtieri, Marcelo Rodríguez Fermepin

Journal: Rev. Argent. Microbiol.. ;47(1):9-16.

 

Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection is nowadays considered one of the most frequent causes of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in the world, mainly affecting the group of young people under 25 years old. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis ...

Last Updated: 3 Apr 2015

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Typing of Chlamydia psittaci to monitor epidemiology of psittacosis and aid disease control in the Netherlands, 2008 to 2013.
 

Author(s): E R Heddema, E J van Hannen, M Bongaerts, F Dijkstra, R J Ten Hove, B de Wever, D Vanrompay

Journal:

 

Last Updated: 14 Feb 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Chlamydia" returned 149 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Conserved type III secretion system exerts important roles in Chlamydia trachomatis.
 

Author(s): Wenting Dai, Zhongyu Li

Journal:

 

Upon infection, Chlamydiae alter host cellular functions in a variety of ways. Chlamydial infection prevents host cell apoptosis, induces re-organization of the actin cytoskeleton and alters host cellular signaling mechanisms. Chlamydia is among the many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria ...

Last Updated: 22 Oct 2014

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Chlamydia psittaci: new insights into genomic diversity, clinical pathology, host-pathogen interaction and anti-bacterial immunity.
 

Author(s): Michael R Knittler, Angela Berndt, Selina Böcker, Pavel Dutow, Frank Hänel, Dagmar Heuer, Danny Kägebein, Andreas Klos, Sophia Koch, Elisabeth Liebler-Tenorio, Carola Ostermann, Petra Reinhold, Hans Peter Saluz, Gerhard Schöfl, Philipp Sehnert, Konrad Sachse

Journal: Int. J. Med. Microbiol.. 2014 Oct;304(7):877-93.

 

The distinctive and unique features of the avian and mammalian zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia (C.) psittaci include the fulminant course of clinical disease, the remarkably wide host range and the high proportion of latent infections that are not leading to overt disease. Current knowledge ...

Last Updated: 2 Dec 2014

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Membrane vesicle production by Chlamydia trachomatis as an adaptive response.
 

Author(s): Kyla M Frohlich, Ziyu Hua, Alison J Quayle, Jin Wang, Maria E Lewis, Chau-wen Chou, Miao Luo, Lyndsey R Buckner, Li Shen

Journal:

 

Bacteria have evolved specific adaptive responses to cope with changing environments. These adaptations include stress response phenotypes with dynamic modifications of the bacterial cell envelope and generation of membrane vesicles (MVs). The obligate intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia ...

Last Updated: 24 Jun 2014

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Time to Eradication of Mycoplasma Genitalium and Chlamydia Trachomatis After Treatment Commenced
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Urethritis; Cervicitis; Genital Mycoplasma Infection; Chlamydia Trachomatis

 

Last Updated: 12 Dec 2014

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Last Updated: 28 Aug 2010

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Trial of an Adapted STD Screening and Risk Reduction Intervention
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Diagnostic Self Evaluation; Gonorrhea; Unprotected Sex; Chlamydia; Trichomonas

 

Last Updated: 29 Jul 2015

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