Acute angle-closure glaucoma

Common Name(s)

Acute angle-closure glaucoma

Acute angle-closure glaucoma (AACG) is a condition in which there is a blockage of fluid drainage from the eye. When fluid cannot drain properly from the eye, the pressure inside the eye may rise to a level that can damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is the nerve that brings information from the back of the eye (retina), and damage to this nerve can result in vision loss and blindness. AACG occurs when the edge of the colored part of the eye that controls light entry (iris) covers the drainage canal. The drainage canal is a narrow tube that normally allows aqueous fluid to leave the anterior chamber of the eye. In AACG, the iris changes shape so that the angle between the iris and outer lens of the eye (cornea) is blocked and aqueous fluid cannot pass through.

Those affected by AACG will have a sudden increase in intraocular pressure (IOP), or pressure in the eye. Aside from injury, AACG can be a result of the way parts of the eye are shaped, including having a smaller anterior chamber, thin ciliary bodies (controls eye lens contraction and production of aqueous humor), a thin iris, a forward-sitting lens, a narrow angle between the cornea and iris, and a short front-to-back eye length. When the pupil dilates, the iris contracts to increase the amount of light that enters the eye (dilates). This alone can sometimes block fluid drainage. Symptoms of AACG include eye pain, nausea, vomiting, and blurred vision. Females, elderly, and those of Asian descent are at an increased risk for AACG.

Medical attention should be sought urgently if symptoms of AACG are present in order to prevent permanent vision loss. Treatment options include medications or surgery to remove part of the iris and allow for fluid drainage. If you have been diagnosed with AACG, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options. Support groups are good sources of more information and can connect you with other people living with glaucoma.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acute angle-closure glaucoma" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acute angle-closure glaucoma" returned 67 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Acute angle-closure glaucoma in retinopathy of prematurity following pupil dilation.
 

Author(s): Shiu-Chen Wu, Yung-Sung Lee, Wei-Chi Wu, Shirley H L Chang

Journal:

 

Pupil dilation is a known risk factor for acute angle-closure glaucoma. Regular retinal evaluation is necessary for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) cases. An acute attack of angle-closure glaucoma following pupil dilation in regressed ROP has never been reported.

Last Updated: 8 Aug 2015

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Should anesthesiologists be concerned with acute angle closure glaucoma?
 

Author(s): Steven A Nissman

Journal: Anesth Prog. 2015 ;62(2):83.

 

Last Updated: 11 Jun 2015

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Acute angle-closure glaucoma after general anesthesia for bone grafting.
 

Author(s): Yukie Nitta, Nobuhito Kamekura, Shigeru Takuma, Toshiaki Fujisawa

Journal: Anesth Prog. 2014 ;61(4):162-4.

 

Acute angle-closure glaucoma (AACG) is a rare complication of general anesthesia. The coexistence of individual risk factors for postoperative AACG and factors associated with intraocular hypertension are considered to be required for postoperative AACG to develop. We present a case ...

Last Updated: 18 Dec 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acute angle-closure glaucoma" returned 4 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Acute myopia and angle closure glaucoma from topiramate in a seven-year-old: a case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Yuna Rapoport, Nancy Benegas, Rachel W Kuchtey, Karen M Joos

Journal:

 

A case is reported of acute bilateral myopia and angle closure glaucoma in a 7-year-old patient from topiramate toxicity. This is the second known reported case of topiramate induced acute angle closure glaucoma and third known reported case of topiramate induced acute myopia in a pediatric patient.

Last Updated: 18 Apr 2014

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[Acute angle closure and angle closure glaucoma: Phacoemulsification as first-line treatment].
 

Author(s): Y Lachkar

Journal: J Fr Ophtalmol. 2010 Apr;33(4):273-8.

 

Angle closure glaucoma is characterized by an optic neuropathy with a glaucomatous visual field defect with a white painless eye and mimics primary open-angle glaucoma. Acute angle closure attack is more symptomatic, with a red painful eye and elevated intraocular pressure. In both ...

Last Updated: 19 Apr 2010

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Current understanding of the treatment and outcome of acute primary angle-closure glaucoma: an Asian perspective.
 

Author(s): Leslie P S Ang, Leonard P K Ang

Journal: Ann. Acad. Med. Singap.. 2008 Mar;37(3):210-5.

 

Primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) is a major cause of blindness among Asians. A better understanding of the disease will improve the treatment and outcome of this condition.

Last Updated: 8 Apr 2008

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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