Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Common Name(s)

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a form of degenerative arthritis characterized by excessive bone growth along the sides of the vertebrae of the spine.  Also known as Forestier disease, DISH causes stiffness in the upper back, and may also affect the neck and lower back.  Some people experience DISH-associated inflammation and calcification (bone growth) at other areas of the body where tendons and ligaments attach to bone, such as at the heels, ankles, hips, shoulders, elbows, knees and hands.  The exact cause of DISH remains unknown, although risk factors such as age, gender, long-term use of certain medications and chronic health conditions have been identified.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis" returned 32 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Epidural hematoma associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.
 

Author(s): Ryoji Tauchi, Shiro Imagama, Kotaro Satake, Toshiki Iwase, Naoki Ishiguro

Journal: Turk Neurosurg. 2014 ;24(1):98-101.

 

The authors describe the clinical findings, radiographic appearance and surgical treatment of a spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). An 81-year-old male patient injured after falling from a 2.5 m tree presented ...

Last Updated: 18 Feb 2014

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Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis causing dysphagia in a young patient.
 

Author(s): Julio Urrutia, Andrés Bernardín, Cristián Morales, Rodrigo Millán

Journal: Rev Med Chil. 2013 Jun;141(6):803-6.

 

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is an under-diagnosed condition producing flowing ossification of the antero-lateral ligaments of the spine. Affecting predominantly males over 65 years old, it is an unusual cause of dysphagia and dysphonia. We report a 45-year-old ...

Last Updated: 14 Oct 2013

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A comparison of new bone formation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: a retrospective cohort study over six years.
 

Author(s): X Baraliakos, J Listing, J Buschmann, A von der Recke, J Braun

Journal: Arthritis Rheum.. 2012 Apr;64(4):1127-33.

 

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) are both characterized by new bone formation in the spine but presumably have a different pathogenesis. This study was undertaken to compare the natural course of new bone formation in AS and DISH.

Last Updated: 29 Mar 2012

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis" returned 4 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Extraspinal manifestations of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.
 

Author(s): Reuven Mader, Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini, Fabiola Atzeni, Ignazio Olivieri, Nicola Pappone, Jorrit-Jan Verlaan, Dan Buskila

Journal: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2009 Dec;48(12):1478-81.

 

DISH is a condition characterized by calcification and/or ossification of soft tissues, mainly entheses, ligaments and joint capsules. Its prevalence increases with age and, therefore, DISH is a relatively common entity in the elderly. The classical site of involvement is the spinal ...

Last Updated: 17 Nov 2009

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Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis with cervical spinal cord injury -a report of 3 cases and a literature review.
 

Author(s): S Sreedharan, Y H Li

Journal: Ann. Acad. Med. Singap.. 2005 Apr;34(3):257-61.

 

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), though common, is often asymptomatic. However, spinal hyperostosis can predispose the affected to chronic myelopathic symptoms and acute spinal cord injury.

Last Updated: 24 May 2005

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[Ankylosed spine fractures with spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: diagnosis and complications].
 

Author(s): F de Peretti, J-C Sane, G Dran, C Razafindratsiva, C Argenson

Journal: Rev Chir Orthop Reparatrice Appar Mot. 2004 Sep;90(5):456-65.

 

Spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis or idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis can raise difficult diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Spinal fracture is well known in ankylosing spondylitis but exceptional in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. The purpose of ...

Last Updated: 25 Oct 2004

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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