Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Common Name(s)

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a form of degenerative arthritis characterized by excessive bone growth along the sides of the vertebrae of the spine.  Also known as Forestier disease, DISH causes stiffness in the upper back, and may also affect the neck and lower back.  Some people experience DISH-associated inflammation and calcification (bone growth) at other areas of the body where tendons and ligaments attach to bone, such as at the heels, ankles, hips, shoulders, elbows, knees and hands.  The exact cause of DISH remains unknown, although risk factors such as age, gender, long-term use of certain medications and chronic health conditions have been identified.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis" returned 45 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis with cervical myelopathy.
 

Author(s): Aria Nouri, Michael G Fehlings

Journal: CMAJ. 2017 03;189(10):E410.

 

Last Updated: 7 Apr 2017

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Thoracic spondylolisthesis and spinal cord compression in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: a case report.
 

Author(s): Yasutaka Takagi, Hiroshi Yamada, Hidehumi Ebara, Hiroyuki Hayashi, Takeshi Iwanaga, Kengo Shimozaki, Yoshiyuki Kitano, Kenji Kagechika, Hiroyuki Tsuchiya

Journal:

 

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis has long been regarded as a benign asymptomatic clinical entity with an innocuous clinical course. Neurological complications are rare in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. However, if they do occur, the consequences are often significant ...

Last Updated: 1 Apr 2017

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Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis and Thoracic Kyphosis in Older Men and Women.
 

Author(s): Wendy B Katzman, Neeta Parimi, Ziba Mansoori, Lorenzo Nardo, Deborah M Kado, Peggy M Cawthon, Lynn M Marshall, John T Schousboe, Nancy E Lane,

Journal: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2017 Aug;69(8):1245-1252.

 

To investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and thoracic kyphosis in older persons.

Last Updated: 10 Oct 2016

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis" returned 10 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in the dog (DISH): a review].
 

Author(s): S Ohlerth, G Steiner, U Geissb├╝hler, M Fl├╝ckiger

Journal: Schweiz. Arch. Tierheilkd.. 2016 May;158(5):331-9.

 

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a common, non-inflammatory, systemic disease of the spine and the abaxial skeleton in humans and dogs. Spondylosis deformans (SD) must be considered as an important differential diagnosis which in humans, unlike DISH, is always accompanied ...

Last Updated: 13 Aug 2016

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Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) and non small cell lung cancer: case presentation and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Ioannis Tomos, Aikaterini Vlami, Anna Karakatsani, Ioanna Korbila, Effrosyni D Manali, Spyros A Papiris

Journal: Pneumonol Alergol Pol. 2016 ;84(2):116-8.

 

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier's disease, is a systemic non inflammatory disease of unknown cause. It is characterized by the presence of osteophytes due to calcification and ossification of spinal ligaments and entheses. Moreover, diffuse ...

Last Updated: 30 May 2016

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Diagnosis of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis with chest computed tomography: inter-observer agreement.
 

Author(s): S F Oudkerk, Pim A de Jong, M Attrach, T Luijkx, C F Buckens, W P Th M Mali, F C Oner, D L Resnick, R Vliegenthart, J J Verlaan

Journal: Eur Radiol. 2017 Jan;27(1):188-194.

 

To evaluate and improve the interobserver agreement for the CT-based diagnosis of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).

Last Updated: 21 Apr 2016

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Magnetic Resonance Imaging in High Risk Patients for the Development of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH)
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Hyperostosis, Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal; Metabolic Syndrome; Diabetes Mellitus

 

Last Updated: 4 Aug 2017

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