Cutaneous mastocytosis

Common Name(s)

Cutaneous mastocytosis, Urticaria pigmentosa

Cutaneous mastocytosis is a condition caused by the accumulation of mast cells in the skin. Mast cells contain substances such as histamine that regulate allergic reactions. This condition is usually diagnosed in children and typically resolves by puberty. Treatment is generally based on a person's symptoms, but it may include antihistamines to prevent the effect of mast cell histamine.

There are several different types of cutaneous mastocytosis. Urticaria pigmentosa is the most common form and is characterized by brown patches on the skin where mast cells have accumulated. Diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis is a very rare form of the condition that presents at birth with skin that is thickened and easily blistered. A mastocytoma is raised nodule that is also usually seen in infancy. Another rare form that occurs in adults is called telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans (TMEP).
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Cutaneous mastocytosis" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Cutaneous mastocytosis" returned 19 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Expression of the basophil-specific antibodies 2D7 and BB1 in patients with cutaneous Mastocytosis.
 

Author(s): M A Idoate, J Echeveste, P Gil, M L Sanz, M Ferrer

Journal: J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. 2013 ;23(6):392-7.

 

2D7 and BB1 are thought to be basophil-specific markers. In this study, we tested both antibodies in different skin and mast cell disorders with the aim of determining whether it was possible to differentiate between benign and aggressive presentations of mastocytosis.

Last Updated: 27 Jan 2014

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Letter: Cutaneous mastocytosis with systemic involvement mimicking clinical and dermatoscopically multiple melanocytic nevi.
 

Author(s): Enrique Gutiérrez-González, Manuel Ginarte, Jaime Toribio

Journal:

 

Mastocytosis can sometimes resemble other skin conditions, especially pigmented ones, not only clinically but also dermatoscopically. We report the case of a woman with the diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis mimicking multiple melanocytic nevi. Melanocytic stimulation can be induced ...

Last Updated: 5 Dec 2011

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Diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis: report of a severe case with fatal outcome.
 

Author(s): Maryam Ghiasi, Alireza Ghanadan, Shab Bu Jesri, Soheyla Sotudeh, Asghar Ramyar

Journal:

 

Diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis (DCM) is a rare variant of mastocytosis. We describe a case of DCM with a very severe presentation at birth and fatal outcome.

Last Updated: 23 Mar 2011

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Cutaneous mastocytosis" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Diagnosis and treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis in children: practical recommendations.
 

Author(s): Mariana Castells, Dean D Metcalfe, Luis Escribano

Journal: Am J Clin Dermatol. 2011 Aug;12(4):259-70.

 

Cutaneous mastocytosis in children is a generally benign disease that can present at birth and is often associated with mast cell mediator-related symptoms including pruritus, flushing, and abdominal pain with diarrhea. The most common form of presentation is urticaria pigmentosa, ...

Last Updated: 14 Jun 2011

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Pediatric cutaneous mastocytosis: a review of 180 patients.
 

Author(s): Dan Ben-Amitai, Aryeh Metzker, Herman A Cohen

Journal: Isr. Med. Assoc. J.. 2005 May;7(5):320-2.

 

Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by the abnormal infiltration of mast cells in the skin and, sometimes, other organs. Some patients may experience symptoms related to mast cell mediator release.

Last Updated: 24 May 2005

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Cutaneous and systemic manifestations of mastocytosis.
 

Author(s): W A Alto, L Clarcq

Journal: Am Fam Physician. 1999 Jun;59(11):3047-54, 3059-60.

 

Mastocytosis is characterized by an excessive number of apparently normal mast cells in the skin and, occasionally, in other organs. Characteristic skin lesions, called urticaria pigmentosa, are present in most patients, but clinical presentation can vary from a pruritic rash to unexplained ...

Last Updated: 9 Jul 1999

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

A Phase 3 Study to Compare Efficacy and Safety of Masitinib to Placebo in the Treatment of Patients With Smouldering Systemic, Indolent Systemic or Cutaneous Mastocytosis With Handicap
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Smouldering Systemic Mastocytosis; Indolent Systemic Mastocytosis; Cutaneous Mastocytosis With Handicap; Mastocytosis

 

Last Updated: 25 Sep 2012

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Study of Factors Regulating Mast Cell Proliferation
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Mastocytosis

 

Last Updated: 5 Dec 2014

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A Two-Step Approach to Reduced Intensity Bone Marrow Transplant for Patients With Hematological Malignancies
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mastocytosis; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

 

Last Updated: 11 Sep 2014

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