Progesterone resistance

Common Name(s)

Progesterone resistance

Progesterone prepares the endometrium for blastocyst implantation and allows maintenance of pregnancy. The major sources of progesterone are the corpus luteum during the second half of the menstrual cycle and at the beginning of pregnancy, and the placenta. The main hormones responsible for stimulation of progesterone secretion are luteinizing hormone (LH) for the corpus luteum of the menstrual cycle and chorionic gonadotropin for the corpus luteum of pregnancy. Complete end-organ resistance to progesterone would be incompatible with reproductive competence in females. Males would not be expected to be affected since progesterone has no known function in men. Failure of the uterus to respond to progesterone would lead to the development of a 'constantly proliferative' endometrium incompatible with blastocyst implantation. Partial resistance to progesterone, on the other hand, would be expected to be associated with various degrees of incomplete maturation of the endometrium, perhaps expressed clinically as infertility or early abortions. The syndrome would present with the clinical and histologic picture of a luteal phase defect in which the life span of the corpus luteum and the plasma progesterone concentrations would be normal or elevated.
 

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Progesterone resistance" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Progesterone resistance" returned 9 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Progesterone receptor downregulates breast cancer resistance protein expression via binding to the progesterone response element in breast cancer.
 

Author(s): Xiaojuan Wu, Xiaofang Zhang, Hui Zhang, Peng Su, Weiwei Li, Li Li, Yan Wang, Wenjun Liu, Peng Gao, Gengyin Zhou

Journal: Cancer Sci.. 2012 May;103(5):959-67.

 

Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) plays a major role in multidrug resistance (MDR). Sequence analysis reveals there is a novel progesterone response element (PRE) in the BCRP promoter, suggesting progesterone receptor (PR) may have a function in the regulation of BCRP expression. ...

Last Updated: 25 Apr 2012

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Progesterone resistance in PCOS endometrium: a microarray analysis in clomiphene citrate-treated and artificial menstrual cycles.
 

Author(s): Ricardo F Savaris, Jeremy M Groll, Steven L Young, Franco J DeMayo, Jae-Wook Jeong, Amy E Hamilton, Linda C Giudice, Bruce A Lessey

Journal: J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.. 2011 Jun;96(6):1737-46.

 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrinopathy of reproductive-aged women, is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism.

Last Updated: 23 May 2011

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Subfertility linked to combined luteal insufficiency and uterine progesterone resistance.
 

Author(s): Toshihiro Konno, Amanda R Graham, Lea A Rempel, Jennifer K Ho-Chen, S M Khorshed Alam, Pengli Bu, M A Karim Rumi, Michael J Soares

Journal: Endocrinology. 2010 Sep;151(9):4537-50.

 

Early pregnancy loss is common and can be caused by a range of factors. The Brown Norway (BN) rat exhibits reproductive dysfunction characterized by small litter size and pregnancy failure and represents a model for investigating early pregnancy loss. In this study, we investigated ...

Last Updated: 25 Aug 2010

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

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The terms "Progesterone resistance" returned 5 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Endometrial progesterone resistance and PCOS.
 

Author(s): Xin Li, Yi Feng, Jin-Fang Lin, HÃ¥kan Billig, Ruijin Shao

Journal:

 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a state of altered steroid hormone production and activity. Chronic estrogen exposure or lack of progesterone due to ovarian dysfunction can result in endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma. A key contributor to our understanding of progesterone ...

Last Updated: 10 Feb 2014

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17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 deficiency and progesterone resistance in endometriosis.
 

Author(s): Serdar E Bulun, You-Hong Cheng, Mary Ellen Pavone, Ping Yin, Gonca Imir, Hiroki Utsunomiya, Stephen Thung, Qing Xue, Erica E Marsh, Hideki Tokunaga, Hiroshi Ishikawa, Takeshi Kurita, Emily J Su

Journal: Semin. Reprod. Med.. 2010 Jan;28(1):44-50.

 

Estradiol (E2) stimulates the growth and inflammation in the ectopic endometriotic tissue that commonly resides on the pelvic organs. Several clinical and laboratory-based observations are indicative of resistance to progesterone action in endometriosis. The molecular basis of progesterone ...

Last Updated: 29 Jan 2010

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Molecular mechanisms of treatment resistance in endometriosis: the role of progesterone-hox gene interactions.
 

Author(s): Hakan Cakmak, Hugh S Taylor

Journal: Semin. Reprod. Med.. 2010 Jan;28(1):69-74.

 

HOX genes, encoding homeodomain transcription factors, are dynamically expressed in endometrium, where they are necessary for endometrial growth, differentiation, and implantation. In human endometrium, the expression of HOXA10 and HOXA11 is driven by sex steroids, with peak expression ...

Last Updated: 27 Jan 2010

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 14 Jul 2017

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Health Care Coach Support in Reducing Acute Care Use and Cost in Patients With Cancer
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Brain Glioblastoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Head and Neck Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progressive Disease; Recurrent Carcinoma; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bone Sarcoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IVA Bone Sarcoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Bone Sarcoma; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

 

Last Updated: 12 May 2017

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