Blount Disease

Common Name(s)

Blount Disease

Blount disease is characterized by progressive bowing of the legs in infancy, early childhood, or adolescence. While it is not uncommon for young children to have bowed legs, typically the bowing improves with age. Blount disease is a condition that results from abnormal growth in the upper part of the shin bone (tibia) and requires treatment for improvement to occur. Treatment may involve bracing and/or surgery.  Other causes for Blount disease in young children includes metabolic disease and rickets. Blount disease in teens typically occurs in youth who are overweight. In teens surgery is often required to correct the problem.
 

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Blount Disease" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Blount Disease" returned 3 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Outcome analysis of surgical treatment of Blount disease in Nigeria.
 

Author(s): A A Kawu, O O A Salami, A Olawepo, M A Ugbeye, W Yinusa, O O Odunubi

Journal: Niger J Clin Pract. ;15(2):165-7.

 

The objective was to evaluate the results of surgery of Blount diseases using the postoperative metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle (MDA) at 2-year follow-up.

Last Updated: 21 Jun 2012

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Adolescent Blount disease in obese children treated by eight-plate hemiepiphysiodesis.
 

Author(s): Murat Oto, Güney Yılmaz, J Richard Bowen, Mihir Thacker, Richard Kruse

Journal: Eklem Hastalik Cerrahisi. 2012 Apr;23(1):20-4.

 

The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of eight-plate (Orthofix) use during hemiepiphyseodesis operation for growth modulation in obese children with adolescent Blount disease.

Last Updated: 27 Mar 2012

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Advanced tibia vara (Blount disease) in adolescent Nigerians.
 

Author(s): G A Oyemade

Journal: J Natl Med Assoc. 1981 Apr;73(4):339-44.

 

Twenty-five cases of advanced tibia vara occurring in adolescent Nigerians treated at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, are reported. They were aged from 11 to 14 years. The severity of the condition was assessed by measuring the intercondylar distance of the knees, radiological ...

Last Updated: 25 Jun 1981

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

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The terms "Blount Disease" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.