Biliary Atresia

Common Name(s)

Biliary Atresia

Biliary Atresia is a digestive disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the bile duct system. The bile duct system is responsible for storing and transporting bile from the liver, where it is made, to the intestines, where it helps to digest food. Incomplete development of the ducts inhibits the flow of bile. Individuals with this defect have digestion problems as well as a yellow discoloration of the eye and skin (jaundice). Doctors diagnose this defect early in life, as the resulting symptoms are quickly apparent. Treatment is developed on a case-by-case basis and depends on the specific needs of the patient. Digestion specialists may suggest individuals eat a lower-fat diet, or undergo surgery to relieve the blockage or create a tube to allow bile to reach the digestive system.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Biliary Atresia" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Biliary Atresia" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

http://www.agmd-gimotility.org

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Biliary Atresia" returned 231 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

A scoring system for biliary atresia: is this the right one?
 

Author(s): Marco Sciveres, Maria Pina Milazzo, Giuseppe Maggiore

Journal: J. Hepatol.. 2015 Apr;62(4):985-6.

 

Last Updated: 20 Mar 2015

Go To URL
Reply to: "A scoring system for biliary atresia: Is this the right one?".
 

Author(s): Mohamed Abdel-Salam El-Guindi, Mostafa Mohamed Sira, Ahmad Mohamed Sira, Tahany Abdel-Hameed Salem

Journal: J. Hepatol.. 2015 Apr;62(4):986-7.

 

Last Updated: 20 Mar 2015

Go To URL
Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ADD3 gene and susceptibility to biliary atresia.
 

Author(s): Shuaidan Zeng, Peng Sun, Zimin Chen, Jianxiong Mao, Jianyao Wang, Bin Wang, Lei Liu

Journal:

 

Based on the results of previous studies, the ADD3 gene, located in the 10q24.2 region, may be a susceptibility gene of biliary atresia (BA). In this study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ADD3 gene, rs17095355 C/T and rs10509906 G/C, were selected to investigate ...

Last Updated: 7 Oct 2014

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Biliary Atresia" returned 26 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Beyond the Pediatric end-stage liver disease system: solutions for infants with biliary atresia requiring liver transplant.
 

Author(s): Mary Elizabeth M Tessier, Sanjiv Harpavat, Ross W Shepherd, Girish S Hiremath, Mary L Brandt, Amy Fisher, John A Goss

Journal: World J. Gastroenterol.. 2014 Aug;20(32):11062-8.

 

Biliary atresia (BA), a chronic progressive cholestatic disease of infants, is the leading cause for liver transplant in children, especially in patients under two years of age. BA can be successfully treated with the Kasai portoenterostomy; however most patients still require a liver ...

Last Updated: 29 Aug 2014

Go To URL
Maternal microchimerism in biliary atresia: are maternal cells effector cells, targets, or just bystanders?
 

Author(s): Toshihiro Muraji

Journal: Chimerism. ;5(1):1-5.

 

The etiology of biliary atresia (BA) is unknown; however, the liver histology is similar to that observed in immune-mediated hepatic disorders. Liver fibrosis in BA progresses even after bile drainage has been achieved by the Kasai operation. Maternal microchimerism has been purported ...

Last Updated: 18 Apr 2014

Go To URL
Aetiology of biliary atresia: what is actually known?
 

Author(s): Claus Petersen, Mark Davenport

Journal:

 

Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease of unknown etiology and unpredictable outcome, even when there has been timely diagnosis and exemplary surgery. It has been the commonest indication for liver transplantation during childhood for the past 20 years. Hence much clinical and basic ...

Last Updated: 15 Nov 2013

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Biliary Atresia Study in Infants and Children
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Biliary Atresia

 

Last Updated: 15 Sep 2014

Go to URL
Pentoxifylline Therapy in Biliary Atresia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Biliary Atresia

 

Last Updated: 5 Feb 2015

Go to URL
Evaluation of Immune Function in Biliary Atresia Children With Prolonged Jaundice
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Biliary Atresia

 

Last Updated: 9 Sep 2005

Go to URL