Benign Familial Hematuria

Common Name(s)

Benign Familial Hematuria

Benign familial hematuria is an autosomal dominant condition manifest as nonprogressive isolated microscopic hematuria that does not result in renal failure. It is characterized pathologically by thinning of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and can be considered the mildest end of the spectrum of renal diseases due to type IV collagen defects of the basement membrane. The most severe end of the spectrum is represented by Alport syndrome ({301050}; {203780}, {104200}), which results in end-stage renal failure and may be associated with hearing loss and ocular anomalies (review by {5:Lemmink et al. (1996)}).
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Benign Familial Hematuria" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Benign Familial Hematuria" returned 2 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Mutations in theCOL4A4 and COL4A3 genes cause familial benign hematuria.
 

Author(s): Cèlia Badenas, Manuel Praga, Baacuterbara Tazón, Laurence Heidet, Christelle Arrondel, Anna Armengol, Amado Andrés, Enrique Morales, Juan Antonio Camacho, Xose Lens, Sonia Dávila, Montse Milà, Corinne Antignac, Alejandro Darnell, Roser Torra

Journal: J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.. 2002 May;13(5):1248-54.

 

Familial benign hematuria (FBH) is a common autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the presence of persistent or recurrent hematuria. The clinical and pathologic features of this syndrome resemble those of early Alport syndrome (AS), and for this reason a common molecular defect ...

Last Updated: 18 Apr 2002

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Benign familial hematuria due to mutation of the type IV collagen alpha4 gene.
 

Author(s): H H Lemmink, W N Nillesen, T Mochizuki, C H Schröder, H G Brunner, B A van Oost, L A Monnens, H J Smeets

Journal: J. Clin. Invest.. 1996 Sep;98(5):1114-8.

 

Benign familial hematuria (BFH) is characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance, thinning of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and normal renal function. It is frequent in patients with persistent microscopic hematuria, but cannot be clinically differentiated from the initial ...

Last Updated: 4 Nov 1996

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Benign Familial Hematuria" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Alport Syndrome Treatments and Outcomes Registry
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Alport Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 3 Sep 2014

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