Cryptorchidism

Common Name(s)

Cryptorchidism, Undescended testes

Undescended testes, or cryptorchidism, is a condition in which one testis or both testes (or testicles) does not descend from the abdomen into the scrotum by the time of birth. The scrotum is the sac of skin beneath the penis and is the proper location of the testes. This condition is more common among baby boys who are born prematurely, or before 37 weeks of pregnancy. This is a common condition that affects about 30% of premature and 4% of full term male births. Other risk factors for undescended testes are a low birth weight, a family history of undescended testes, having a mother affected by diabetes or obesity, and having a mother who smoked or used alcohol during pregnancy.

During development in the womb, the testes will naturally descend from the abdomen to the scrotum through a tube-like structure called the inguinal canal. If the testes fail to descend, they may be located in the abdomen or in the canal, or they may be completely absent. In a male who is born with only one testicle or with no testicles in the scrotum, it is most common for the testes to be undescended testes and to be located in the inguinal canal. Undescended testes may increase the risk for testicular cancer, and having two undescended testes may affect fertility. This condition can be diagnosed by a doctor by a physical examination.

The goal of treatment for undescended testes is to get the testis or testes to move into the scrotum. Sometimes this may happen naturally, usually by the time the boy reaches 9 months of age, or a doctor may be able to help. If the testes do not descend by 9 months of age, they can be relocated by a minor surgery known as orchiopexy. If your son has been diagnosed with undescended testes, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Cryptorchidism" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Cryptorchidism" returned 171 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Overexpression of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) in boys with cryptorchidism.
 

Author(s): Dorota Toliczenko-Bernatowicz, Ewa Matuszczak, Marzena Tylicka, Beata Szymańska, Marta Komarowska, Ewa Gorodkiewicz, Wojciech Debek, Adam Hermanowicz

Journal:

 

The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulate p53, caspase and Bcl-2 family proteins, and is crucial for the degradation of the defective germ cells in testes. Purpose: to evaluate the concentration of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) in the blood plasma of boys with cryptorchidism ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with cryptorchidism, recurrent pneumothorax, and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis-like foci: A case report.
 

Author(s): Min A Park, So Youn Shin, Young Jin Kim, Myung Jae Park, Seung Hyeun Lee

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Nov;96(47):e8853.

 

Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited collagen disorder caused by defects or deficiency of pro-alpha 1 chain of type III procollagen encoded by COL3A1. vEDS is characterized not only by soft tissue manifestations including hyperextensibility ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Smoking and its association with cryptorchidism in Down syndrome.
 

Author(s): Adrianne Maria Berno de Rezende Duarte, José de Bessa, Flávia Cristina de Carvalho Mrad, Sandra Helena Cerrato Tibiriçá, Maíra Lorenzo de Sá Camargo, Augusto Alves Pinto Vieira, Frederico Cantarino Cordeiro Araujo, André Avarese de Figueiredo, José Murillo de Bastos-Netto

Journal: Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992). 2017 Aug;63(8):693-696.

 

Cryptorchidism is a common and prevalent condition in patients with Down syndrome. Environmental factors, such as smoking, can be associated with malformations during fetal development. The study of the prevalence of cryptorchidism and its association with parental tobacco use in ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Cryptorchidism" returned 17 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Analgesia use during pregnancy and risk of cryptorchidism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
 

Author(s): Jason Gurney, Lorenzo Richiardi, Katherine A McGlynn, Virginia Signal, Diana Sarfati

Journal: Hum. Reprod.. 2017 05;32(5):1118-1129.

 

Are boys who are born to mothers who use analgesics during pregnancy at increased risk of cryptorchidism compared to those born to mothers who do not take analgesia?

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Idiopathic abdominal cocoon syndrome with unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia in a young case of small bowel obstruction.
 

Author(s): Xiang Fei, Hai-Rui Yang, Peng-Fei Yu, Hai-Bo Sheng, Guo-Li Gu

Journal: World J. Gastroenterol.. 2016 May;22(20):4958-62.

 

Abdominal cocoon syndrome (ACS) is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction due to total or partial encapsulation of the small intestine by a fibrocollagenous membrane. Idiopathic ACS with abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia is even rarer clinically. We successfully ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Opinion: Comment on Evaluation and Treatment of Cryptorchidism: AUA/AAP and Nordic Consensus Guidelines.
 

Author(s): Faruk Hadziselimovic

Journal: Urol. Int.. 2016 ;96(3):249-54.

 

The ultimate goal in the treatment of cryptorchidism is to achieve normal fertility. However, in a substantial number of cryptorchid males, early and apparently successful orchidopexy does not improve fertility as it does not address the underlying pathophysiological cause, namely, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 11 Jul 2017

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Orchidopexy Randomized Clinical Assessment
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Unilateral Cryptorchidism

 

Last Updated: 26 Feb 2018

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One Stage vs. Two Stage Gubernaculum Sparing Laparoscopic Orchidopexy (GSLO)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Cryptorchidism

 

Last Updated: 8 Mar 2018

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