Tularemia

Common Name(s)

Tularemia

Tularemia is an infection common in wild rodents caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. It is transmitted to humans by contact with infected animal tissues or by ticks, biting flies, and mosquitoes. The condition is most common in North America and parts of Europe and Asia. It is very rare in the United States. The illness, which is characterized by fever, chills, headache, joint pain and muscle weakness, may continue for several weeks after symptoms begin. Streptomycin and tetracycline are commonly used to treat the infection.

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Tularemia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Tularemia" returned 134 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Ulceroglandular tularemia complicated by pneumonia--a case report.
 

Author(s): Małgorzata Sobolewska-Pilarczyk, Małgorzata Pawłowska, Waldemar Halota

Journal: Przegl Epidemiol. 2014 ;68(3):421-4, 531-4.

 

Tularemia is an antropozoonosis caused by Gram-negative coccobacillus Francisella tularensis. The majority of tularemia cases are reported in summer due to exposure to insect and tick bites. This paper discusses a case of 11-year-old boy diagnosed with ulceroglandular tularemia complicated ...

Last Updated: 13 Nov 2014

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[Tularemia is spreading from north to south side of Turkey: a small outbreak in Kahramanmaras, Turkey].
 

Author(s): İlkay Bozkurt, Selçuk Kiliç

Journal: Mikrobiyol Bul. 2014 Jul;48(3):413-9.

 

Tularemia is a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis. Sporadic tularemia cases have been increasingly reported particularly from provinces located at northwest and central regions of Turkey especially during last two decades, as well as waterborne outbreaks reported from ...

Last Updated: 23 Jul 2014

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Performance of seven serological assays for diagnosing tularemia.
 

Author(s): Valérie Chaignat, Marina Djordjevic-Spasic, Anke Ruettger, Peter Otto, Diana Klimpel, Wolfgang Müller, Konrad Sachse, George Araj, Roland Diller, Herbert Tomaso

Journal:

 

Tularemia is a rare zoonotic disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. Serology is frequently the preferred diagnostic approach, because the pathogen is highly infectious and difficult to cultivate. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the ...

Last Updated: 4 Jun 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Tularemia" returned 12 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Neutrophils: potential therapeutic targets in tularemia?
 

Author(s): Lee-Ann H Allen

Journal:

 

The central role of neutrophils in innate immunity and host defense has long been recognized, and the ability of these cells to efficiently engulf and kill invading bacteria has been extensively studied, as has the role of neutrophil apoptosis in resolution of the inflammatory response. ...

Last Updated: 10 Jan 2014

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Immunotherapy for tularemia.
 

Author(s): Jerod A Skyberg

Journal: Virulence. 2013 Nov;4(8):859-70.

 

Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Francisella is highly infectious via the respiratory route (~10 CFUs) and pulmonary infections due to type A strains of F. tularensis are highly lethal in untreated patients (> 30%). In ...

Last Updated: 31 Jan 2014

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Live attenuated tularemia vaccines: recent developments and future goals.
 

Author(s): Mark E Marohn, Eileen M Barry

Journal: Vaccine. 2013 Aug;31(35):3485-91.

 

In the aftermath of the 2001 anthrax attacks in the U.S., numerous efforts were made to increase the level of preparedness against a biological attack both in the US and worldwide. As a result, there has been an increase in research interest in the development of vaccines and other ...

Last Updated: 29 Jul 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in Genetics Home Reference.

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Pharmacokinetics of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Infection; Hypertension; Anesthesia; Pain; Reflux; Nausea; Edema; Hyperlipidemia; Hypotension; Hypercholesterolemia; Sedation; Anxiolysis; Benzodiazepine Withdrawal; Bipolar Disorder; Autistic Disorder; Schizophrenia; Influenza Treatment or Prophylaxis; Acute Decompensated Heart Failure; Stable Angina; Life-threatening Fungal Infections; Nosocomial Pneumonia; Community Acquired Pneumonia; Acute Bacterial Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis; Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Uncomplicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis; Complicated Urinary Tract Infections; Acute Pyelonephritis; Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections; Inhalational Anthrax (Post-Exposure)

 

Last Updated: 30 Jul 2014

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