Balantidiasis

Common Name(s)

Balantidiasis

Balantidiasis is a rare infection caused by the parasite, Balantidium coli. The parasite can be found in moist or aquatic areas and can be transmitted through contaminated food or water. The parasite may be found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans, pigs and other animals without causing disease or illness. In people with other serious illnesses that weaken the immune system, the parasite may cause frequent diarrhea or constipation, abdominal pain or a perforated colon (a hole in the stomach, bowel or intestines causing a medical emergency).

Preventative measures should be taken when traveling to areas where this infection or parasite is common (endemic) such as the Philippines. The disease is mostly problematic in developing countries where food and water sources are more likely to be contaminated. Preventative measures include frequent hand washing, purifing drinking water, washing all fruits and vegetables with clean water before eating or cooking, and avoiding close contact with infected persons. Diagnosis should be suspected based on symptoms and a history of travel to an area where Balantidiasis is common and can be confirmed through a stool sample. Balantidiasis can be treated with certain medications. You should talk to your doctor if you are experiencing symptoms and have traveled to an area where you may have been exposed.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Balantidiasis" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Balantidiasis" returned 1 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Balantidiasis in Aymara children from the northern Bolivian Altiplano.
 

Author(s): J G Esteban, C Aguirre, R Angles, L R Ash, S Mas-Coma

Journal: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.. 1998 Dec;59(6):922-7.

 

Balantidium coli infection was coprologically studied in 2,124 Aymara children 5-19 years of age from the schools of 22 communities of the northern Bolivian Altiplano over a five-year period. Infection with B. coli was found in 11 of the communities surveyed, with prevalences of 1.0-5.3% ...

Last Updated: 21 Jan 1999

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

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The terms "Balantidiasis" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.