Babesiosis

Common Name(s)

Babesiosis

Babesiosis is a disease caused by a parasite that infects red blood cells. It is spread by the bite of an infected deer tick and occurs in coastal areas in the northeastern United States. Symptoms usually begin to appear from 1 to 8 weeks after being bitten by an infected tick. Most of those who are bitten show very mild signs or no signs at all. If symptoms are present, they include fever, chills, headache, achy joins and muscles, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and dark urine. These symptoms can last several months. People without a healthy spleen, elderly people, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop potentially life-threatening symptoms. Babesiosis can be treated with medication.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Babesiosis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Babesiosis" returned 87 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The Emergence of Clinically Relevant Babesiosis in Southwestern Wisconsin.
 

Author(s): Todd J Kowalski, Dean A Jobe, Emily C Dolan, Anne Kessler, Steven D Lovrich, Steven M Callister

Journal: WMJ. 2015 Aug;114(4):152-7.

 

To determine the frequency and characteristics of babesiosis cases, and to assess the impact of the introduction of a tick-borne infection diagnostic panel on babesiosis diagnosis in the region surrounding La Crosse, Wisconsin, where babesiosis in non-travelers was previously rare.

Last Updated: 5 Oct 2015

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Emergence of babesiosis in China-Myanmar border areas.
 

Author(s): Xia Zhou, Shang Xia, Shou-Qin Yin, Xiao-Nong Zhou

Journal:

 

E. Vannier and P. J. Krause presented an excellent article on "Babesiosis in China, an emerging threat" in the Lancet Infectious Diseases in December 2014, which updated research on human babesiosis in China. However, a neglected and emerging issue has not been mentioned in EV & PJK's ...

Last Updated: 24 Jul 2015

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A retrospective serological survey on human babesiosis in Belgium.
 

Author(s): L Lempereur, B Shiels, P Heyman, E Moreau, C Saegerman, B Losson, L Malandrin

Journal: Clin. Microbiol. Infect.. 2015 Jan;21(1):96.e1-7.

 

In Europe, most clinical babesiosis cases in humans have been attributed to Babesia divergens and Babesia sp. EU1. Babesia microti infection of humans occurs mainly in the United States; although a case of autochthonous B. microti infection and serological evidence of infection have ...

Last Updated: 31 Jan 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Babesiosis" returned 13 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Human babesiosis.
 

Author(s): Wioletta Rożej-Bielicka, Hanna Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Elżbieta Gołąb

Journal: Przegl Epidemiol. 2015 ;69(3):489-94, 605-8.

 

Babesiosis is an emerging parasitic, anthropo-zoonotic tick-borne disease, seldom diagnosed in humans. Caused by Protozoa, Babesia (also called Piroplasma) intraerytrocytic piriform microorganism. Infection of vertebrates is transmitted by ticks. Out of more than 100 Babesia species/genotypes ...

Last Updated: 1 Nov 2015

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Human babesiosis, an emerging tick-borne disease in the People's Republic of China.
 

Author(s): Xia Zhou, Shang Xia, Ji-Lei Huang, Ernest Tambo, Hong-Xiang Zhuge, Xiao-Nong Zhou

Journal:

 

Babesiosis is a typical zoonotic, emerging disease caused by a tick-borne intraerythrocytic protozoan of Babesia spp. that also can be transmitted by blood transfusion. Babesiosis imposes an increasing public-health threat. We reviewed and mapped epidemiological studies on Babesia ...

Last Updated: 28 Apr 2015

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Symptomatic babesiosis in systemic lupus erythematosus: report of a case and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Michael DiLorenzo, Bertrand Agus

Journal: Bull NYU Hosp Jt Dis. 2012 ;70(2):124-6.

 

Last Updated: 15 Aug 2012

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.