B-Cell Lymphomas

Common Name(s)

B-Cell Lymphomas

Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that are part of our body’s immune system and help our body fight infections. Lymphoma occurs when these lymphocytes grow and multiply uncontrollably. The body has two main types of lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). B-cell lymphoma occurs when the B-cells in particular grow into lymphomas. The cancerous lymphocyte cells can then travel to various parts of the body including the lymph nodes, blood, spleen, bone marrow and other organs. There are many different types of B-cell lymphomas and the most common type is called diffuse large b-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) which is aggressive (fast-growing) and requires immediate treatment. There are other forms that are slow-growing and respond well to treatment and can go into remission for many years. Genetic factors as well as environmental factors, weak immune system (immunodeficiency due to an organ transplant or HIV/AIDS), drug and chemical exposures, viruses and other unknown factors are thought to play a role in the development of lymphoma.

Symptoms are variable but can include: swollen lymph glands, fevers, night sweats, fatigue, unexplained weight loss, pain or abdominal bloating, chest pain, cough, difficulty breathing. Diagnosis may include physical exam of the lymph nodes, spleen and liver, blood tests, x-rays, scans, and finally a biopsy from lymph tissue. The treatment and prognosis or outlook depends upon the specific type of B-cell lymphoma and other factors present but often includes radiation, chemotherapy and medications. Speak with your physician for the most current treatment options. Support groups are also a great resource for support and information and can help connect you to other individuals with B-cell lymphoma.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "B-Cell Lymphomas" for support, advocacy or research.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "B-Cell Lymphomas" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "B-Cell Lymphomas" returned 574 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans.
 

Author(s): Karen S Hathcock, Hesed M Padilla-Nash, Jordi Camps, Dong-Mi Shin, Daniel Triner, Arthur L Shaffer, Robert W Maul, Seth M Steinberg, Patricia J Gearhart, Louis M Staudt, Herbert C Morse, Thomas Ried, Richard J Hodes

Journal: Blood. 2015 Nov;126(20):2291-301.

 

The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We ...

Last Updated: 13 Nov 2015

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Bone marrow vascular endothelial growth factor level per platelet count might be a significant predictor for the treatment outcomes of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.
 

Author(s): Jung Sun Kim, Ga Won Gang, Se Ryun Lee, Hwa Jung Sung, Young Park, Dae Sik Kim, Chul Won Choi, Byung Soo Kim

Journal: Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.. 2015 Oct;45(10):914-20.

 

Developing a parameter to predict bone marrow invasion by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is an important unmet medical need for treatment decisions. This study aimed to confirm the validity of the hypothesis that bone marrow plasma vascular endothelial growth factor level might be correlated ...

Last Updated: 9 Oct 2015

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Neutrophils trigger a NF-κB dependent polarization of tumor-supportive stromal cells in germinal center B-cell lymphomas.
 

Author(s): Murielle Grégoire, Fabien Guilloton, Céline Pangault, Frédéric Mourcin, Phaktra Sok, Maelle Latour, Patricia Amé-Thomas, Erwan Flecher, Thierry Fest, Karin Tarte

Journal: Oncotarget. 2015 Jun;6(18):16471-87.

 

Both tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) display specific phenotypic and functional features and contribute to tumor cell niche. However, their bidirectional crosstalk has been poorly studied, in particular in the context of hematological malignancies. ...

Last Updated: 23 Jul 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "B-Cell Lymphomas" returned 38 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment.
 

Author(s): Margarida Lima

Journal: An Bras Dermatol. ;90(5):687-706.

 

Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and ...

Last Updated: 12 Nov 2015

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Mutation of chromatin modifiers; an emerging hallmark of germinal center B-cell lymphomas.
 

Author(s): M A Lunning, M R Green

Journal:

 

Subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas align with different stages of B-cell development. Germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) each share molecular similarities with normal GCB cells. Recent next-generation ...

Last Updated: 17 Oct 2015

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Double hit diffuse large B-cell lymphomas: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.
 

Author(s): Jonathan W Friedberg

Journal: Chin Clin Oncol. 2015 Mar;4(1):9.

 

Although diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is curable with standard chemoimmunotherapy, over 30% of patients with advanced stage disease experience refractory disease or progression. Recent studies suggest that rearrangement of the myc oncogene occurs in approximately 10% of patients ...

Last Updated: 6 Apr 2015

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

 

Last Updated: 20 Oct 2015

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Ibrutinib and Lenalidomide With Dose Adjusted EPOCH-R in Subjects With Relapsed/Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Relapsed; Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Refractory

 

Last Updated: 29 Apr 2016

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Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

 

Last Updated: 31 Mar 2016

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