Spotted fever

Common Name(s)

Spotted fever

Spotted fever is an infectious disease caused by certain types of Rickettsial bacteria. The bacteria are transmitted though tick bites. There are four types of spotted fever: Mediterranean spotted fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Queensland tick typhus, and Helvetica spotted fever. Spotted fevers are difficult to diagnose at first. Common initial symptoms include fever, muscle pains, headache, nausea and vomiting. Later symptoms includes a spotted rash, joint pain, pains in the abdomen or stomach area and forgetfullness. Diagnosis is made usually by the combination of fever, skin rash and known tick bite. Blood tests may also be performed. Most types of spotted fever are mild to moderate illnesses. However if left untreated they can become potentially serious and even fatal, especially in older people and in people whose immune system (the body's defense system against disease and infection) is weak. The most serious type of the spotted fever is the Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and many people affected with Rocky Mountain spotted fever require hospitalization. Antibiotics are used to treat spotted fevers, and if the infection becomes more serious, other symptoms are treated as needed. If you or a family member has been bitten by a tick and develops a fever and skin rash, it is important to go to your doctor.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Spotted fever" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Spotted fever" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Spotted fever" returned 239 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Risk factors associated with the transmission of Brazilian spotted fever in the Piracicaba river basin, State of São Paulo, Brazil.
 

Author(s): Celso Eduardo de Souza, Adriano Pinter, Maria Rita Donalisio

Journal: Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop.. ;48(1):11-7.

 

Brazilian spotted fever (BSF) is a disease transmitted by ticks for which the etiological agent is Rickettsia rickettsii. The present essay evaluates the risk factors associated with the transmission of cases of BSF in the time period between 2003 and 2013 in the Piracicaba river ...

Last Updated: 11 Apr 2015

Go To URL
Brazilian spotted fever: the importance of dermatological signs for early diagnosis.
 

Author(s): Daíne Vargas Couto, Marcelo Zanolli Medeiros, Gunter Hans Filho, Alexandre Moretti de Lima, Aline Blanco Barbosa, Carolina Faria Santos Vicari

Journal: An Bras Dermatol. ;90(2):248-50.

 

Brazilian spotted fever is an acute febrile infectious disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, transmitted by tick bite. As this disease is rare and has high mortality rates in Brazil, the clinical aspects and epidemiological data may help the diagnosis. We report a case of Brazilian ...

Last Updated: 2 Apr 2015

Go To URL
No visible dental staining in children treated with doxycycline for suspected Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.
 

Author(s): Suzanne R Todd, F Scott Dahlgren, Marc S Traeger, Eugenio D Beltrán-Aguilar, Donald W Marianos, Charlene Hamilton, Jennifer H McQuiston, Joanna J Regan

Journal: J. Pediatr.. 2015 May;166(5):1246-51.

 

To evaluate whether cosmetically relevant dental effects occurred among children who had received doxycycline for treatment of suspected Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF).

Last Updated: 29 Apr 2015

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Spotted fever" returned 13 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Ecology, biology and distribution of spotted-fever tick vectors in Brazil.
 

Author(s): Matias P J Szabó, Adriano Pinter, Marcelo B Labruna

Journal:

 

Spotted-fever-caused Rickettsia rickettsii infection is in Brazil the major tick-borne zoonotic disease. Recently, a second and milder human rickettsiosis caused by an agent genetically related to R. parkeri was discovered in the country (Atlantic rainforest strain). Both diseases ...

Last Updated: 22 Jul 2013

Go To URL
Q fever and Mediterranean spotted fever associated with hemophagocytic syndrome: case study and literature review.
 

Author(s): M Lecronier, V Prendki, M Gerin, M Schneerson, A Renvoisé, C Larroche, M Ziol, O Fain, A Mekinian

Journal: Int. J. Infect. Dis.. 2013 Aug;17(8):e629-33.

 

Hemophagocytosis during Q fever (QF) and Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is rare and only a few cases have been reported. We aimed to investigate the characteristics, outcome, and treatment of QF/MSF-associated hemophagocytosis.

Last Updated: 17 Jun 2013

Go To URL
A case of Japanese spotted fever complicated with central nervous system involvement and multiple organ failure.
 

Author(s): Ruka Nakata, Masakatsu Motomura, Masahiro Tokuda, Hideki Nakajima, Tomoko Masuda, Taku Fukuda, Akira Tsujino, Toshiro Yoshimura, Atsushi Kawakami

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2012 ;51(7):783-6.

 

Japanese spotted fever (JSF), first reported in 1984, is a rickettsial disease characterized by high fever, rash, and eschar formation. A 61-year-old man was admitted to a local hospital in Nagasaki City, Japan, after several days of high fever and generalized skin erythema. His condition ...

Last Updated: 2 Apr 2012

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in Genetics Home Reference.

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Laboratory Diagnosis of of Rickettsial and Rickettsia-like Diseases
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Rickettsioses

 

Last Updated: 28 Sep 2012

Go to URL
Pharmacokinetics of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Infection; Hypertension; Anesthesia; Pain; Reflux; Nausea; Edema; Hyperlipidemia; Hypotension; Hypercholesterolemia; Sedation; Anxiolysis; Benzodiazepine Withdrawal; Bipolar Disorder; Autistic Disorder; Schizophrenia; Influenza Treatment or Prophylaxis; Acute Decompensated Heart Failure; Stable Angina; Life-threatening Fungal Infections; Nosocomial Pneumonia; Community Acquired Pneumonia; Acute Bacterial Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis; Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Uncomplicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis; Complicated Urinary Tract Infections; Acute Pyelonephritis; Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections; Inhalational Anthrax (Post-Exposure); Infantile Hemangioma

 

Last Updated: 27 Feb 2015

Go to URL