Rocky mountain spotted fever

Common Name(s)

Rocky mountain spotted fever

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease that primarily affects those in North and South America, transmitted to humans by the bite of infected ticks. RMSF cases have been reported throughout most of the United States, though the states of North Carolina, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Missouri account for over 60% of cases, with the majority of cases reported have peaked during the summer months in June and July. Children under 10 years old, Native Americans, people with a compromised immune system, and people with delayed treatment are most at risk of a fatal outcome from RMSF. Signs and symptoms of RMSF include fever, headache, abdominal pain, rash, vomiting, and muscle pain. If not treated immediately, RMSF can be a severe or even fatal illness. RMSF and other tick-borne diseases are preventable.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Rocky mountain spotted fever" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Rocky mountain spotted fever" returned 51 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Why sulfonamides are contraindicated in Rocky Mountain spotted fever.
 

Author(s): Vicky Ren, Sylvia Hsu

Journal:

 

Sulfonamide antibiotics are not effective for the treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). Patients suspected of having RMSF based on history and physical exam should be treated with doxycycline and not a sulfonamide to avoid increased morbidity and mortality.

Last Updated: 11 Mar 2014

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Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in a patient treated with anti-TNF-alpha inhibitors.
 

Author(s): Rana M Mays, Rachel A Gordon, K Celeste Durham, Whitney J LaPolla, Stephen K Tyring

Journal:

 

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is a tick-bourne illness, which can be fatal if unrecognized. We discuss the case of a patient treated with an anti-TNF-alpha inhibitor for rheumatoid arthritis who later developed a generalized erythematous macular eruption accompanied by fever. ...

Last Updated: 4 Apr 2013

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Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding Rocky Mountain spotted fever among healthcare providers, Tennessee, 2009.
 

Author(s): Emily Mosites, L Rand Carpenter, Kristina McElroy, Mary J Lancaster, Tue H Ngo, Jennifer McQuiston, Caleb Wiedeman, John R Dunn

Journal: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.. 2013 Jan;88(1):162-6.

 

Tennessee has a high incidence of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), the most severe tick-borne rickettsial illness in the United States. Some regions in Tennessee have reported increased illness severity and death. Healthcare providers in all regions of Tennessee were surveyed ...

Last Updated: 10 Jan 2013

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Rocky mountain spotted fever" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Rocky mountain spotted fever.
 

Author(s): A R Thorner, D H Walker, W A Petri

Journal: Clin. Infect. Dis.. 1998 Dec;27(6):1353-9; quiz 1360.

 

Last Updated: 8 Mar 1999

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Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a disease in need of microbiological concern.
 

Author(s): D H Walker

Journal: Clin. Microbiol. Rev.. 1989 Jul;2(3):227-40.

 

Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a life-threatening tick-transmitted infection, is the most prevalent rickettsiosis in the United States. This zoonosis is firmly entrenched in the tick host, which maintains the rickettsiae in nature by transovarian transmission. Although the incidence ...

Last Updated: 27 Sep 1989

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Pharmacokinetics of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Infection; Hypertension; Anesthesia; Pain; Reflux; Nausea; Edema; Hyperlipidemia; Hypotension; Hypercholesterolemia; Sedation; Anxiolysis; Benzodiazepine Withdrawal; Bipolar Disorder; Autistic Disorder; Schizophrenia; Influenza Treatment or Prophylaxis; Acute Decompensated Heart Failure; Stable Angina; Life-threatening Fungal Infections; Nosocomial Pneumonia; Community Acquired Pneumonia; Acute Bacterial Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis; Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Uncomplicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis; Complicated Urinary Tract Infections; Acute Pyelonephritis; Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections; Inhalational Anthrax (Post-Exposure)

 

Last Updated: 30 Jul 2014

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