Q fever

Common Name(s)

Q fever

Q fever is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. This disease is common in both animals and humans. Q fever is usually a mild disease that has flue like symptoms. However in rare cases when the infection returns, it can affect the heart, liver, brain or lungs. This type of the Q fever can lead to atypical pneumonia, hepatitis, and inflammation of inner lining of the heart. Common symptoms include, dry cough, fever, headache, joint pain, muscle pain. Other symptoms may include abdominal pain, rash, yellow skin, and shortness of breath. These symptoms often appear 20 days after the individual is expose to the bacteria. Q fever is usually treated with antibiotics like doxycycline. However when the infection lasts for more than 6 months, hydroxychloroquine might be also prescribed. This disease is more common in individuals who have contact with farm animals and raw dairy products. Talk with your doctor if you or your child has been diagnosed with Q fever to decide on the best treatment plan.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Q fever" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Q fever" returned 476 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Q Fever Manifested as Acalculous Cholecystitis.
 

Author(s): Moshe Simons, Samuel N Heyman, Michael Bursztyn, Oded Shalev, Nurith Hiller, Sarah Israel

Journal: Isr. Med. Assoc. J.. 2015 Nov;17(11):714-6.

 

Last Updated: 13 Jan 2016

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Q Fever Outbreak Among Travelers to Germany Who Received Live Cell Therapy--United States and Canada, 2014.
 

Author(s): Misha P Robyn, Alexandra P Newman, Michael Amato, Mary Walawander, Cynthia Kothe, James D Nerone, Cynthia Pomerantz, Casey Barton Behravesh, Holly M Biggs, F Scott Dahlgren, Emily G Pieracci, Yvonne Whitfield, Doug Sider, Omar Ozaldin, Lisa Berger, Peter A Buck, Mark Downing, Debra Blog

Journal:

 

During September–November 2014, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) was notified of five New York state residents who had tested seropositive for Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. All five patients had symptoms compatible with Q fever (e.g., fever, ...

Last Updated: 1 Oct 2015

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Integrating interdisciplinary methodologies for One Health: goat farm re-implicated as the probable source of an urban Q fever outbreak, the Netherlands, 2009.
 

Author(s): Georgia A F Ladbury, Jeroen P G Van Leuken, Arno Swart, Piet Vellema, Barbara Schimmer, Ronald Ter Schegget, Wim Van der Hoek

Journal:

 

In spring 2008, a goat farm experiencing Q fever abortions ("Farm A") was identified as the probable source of a human Q fever outbreak in a Dutch town. In 2009, a larger outbreak with 347 cases occurred in the town, despite no clinical Q fever being reported from any local farm.

Last Updated: 4 Sep 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Q fever" returned 37 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Q fever in French Guiana.
 

Author(s): Carole Eldin, Aba Mahamat, Magalie Demar, Philippe Abboud, Félix Djossou, Didier Raoult

Journal: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.. 2014 Oct;91(4):771-6.

 

Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is present worldwide. Recent studies have shown that this bacterium is an emerging pathogen in French Guiana and has a high prevalence (24% of community-acquired pneumonia). In this review, we focus on the peculiar epidemiology of ...

Last Updated: 2 Oct 2014

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Two rare manifestations of Q fever: splenic and hepatic abscesses and cerebral venous thrombosis, with literature review ma non troppo.
 

Author(s): Manuel Mendes Gomes, Andreia Chaves, Ana Gouveia, Lèlita Santos

Journal:

 

Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. It often manifests as a flu-like syndrome; other common manifestations are pneumonia, hepatitis and endocarditis. Its course may be acute or chronic. The authors present two clinical cases of Q fever with rare manifestations. Case ...

Last Updated: 6 Feb 2014

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Antimicrobial therapies for Q fever.
 

Author(s): Gilbert J Kersh

Journal: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2013 Nov;11(11):1207-14.

 

Q fever is caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii and has both acute and chronic forms. The acute disease is a febrile illness often with headache and myalgia that can be self-limiting, whereas the chronic disease typically presents as endocarditis and can be life threatening. ...

Last Updated: 24 Oct 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

A Screening Strategy for Q Fever Among Pregnant Women
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Q Fever

 

Last Updated: 30 Jun 2010

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Pharmacokinetics of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Infection; Hypertension; Pain; Reflux; Edema; Hyperlipidemia; Hypotension; Hypercholesterolemia; Sedation; Anxiolysis; Benzodiazepine Withdrawal; Bipolar Disorder; Autistic Disorder; Schizophrenia; Influenza Treatment or Prophylaxis; Acute Decompensated Heart Failure; Stable Angina; Life-threatening Fungal Infections; Nosocomial Pneumonia; Community Acquired Pneumonia; Acute Bacterial Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis; Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Uncomplicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis; Complicated Urinary Tract Infections; Acute Pyelonephritis; Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections; Inhalational Anthrax (Post-Exposure); Infantile Hemangioma; Withdrawal; Inflammation; Bacterial Septicemia; Cytomegalovirus Retinitis; Herpes Simplex Virus; Adenovirus; Brain Swelling; Airway Swelling; Adrenal Insufficiency; Anxiety; Nausea; Vomiting; Convulsions; Muscle Spasms; Seizures; Epilepsy; Bartonellosis; Brucellosis; Cholera; Plague; Psittacosis; Q Fever; Relapsing Fever; Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever; Trachoma; Tularemia; Typhus Fever; Bronchospasm; Cardiac Arrest; Hypersensitivity Reaction; Cyanide Poisoning; Acute Bacterial Sinusitis; Bacterial Meningitis; Sepsis; Gastroparesis; Opioid Addiction; Migraines; Headaches

 

Last Updated: 4 Feb 2016

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Laboratory Diagnosis of of Rickettsial and Rickettsia-like Diseases
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Rickettsioses

 

Last Updated: 28 Sep 2012

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