Ptosis

Common Name(s)

Ptosis

Ptosis is a term used to describe excessive drooping of a person’s eyelid(s). This usually occurs due to weakness in the muscles elevating eyelid or due to an underlying injury to specific nerves or parts of the brain. Ptosis can lead to tearing and damaged vision. This condition can be diagnosed through a thorough physical examination. Treatment for the condition depends on the severity as well as the underlying condition. Eyelid lift surgery can fix the appearance of the lid, and in more severe cases surgery may also be needed to correct damaged vision. Some infants are born with ptosis, and in this case, or in the case of children that develop ptosis, surgery may need to be done to prevent them from having a lazy eye.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Ptosis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Ptosis" returned 145 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Ptosis repair using preserved fascia lata with the modified direct tarsal fixation technique.
 

Author(s): Ji Young Suh, Hee Bae Ahn

Journal: Korean J Ophthalmol. 2013 Oct;27(5):311-5.

 

To evaluate the clinical outcome of frontalis sling operation using preserved fascia lata with modified direct tarsal fixation in congenital ptosis patients.

Last Updated: 1 Oct 2013

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Uncorrectable ptosis: primary cutaneous signet-ring cell carcinoma.
 

Author(s): Mark S Hansen, Sulene L Chi, Thomas Cummings, Julie A Woodward

Journal:

 

Primary cutaneous signet-ring cell carcinoma (PCSRCC) is a rare but aggressive tumor. Our case highlights a 60-year-old man who presented with eyelid ptosis, for which he underwent multiple surgical procedures over a 3-year period prior to referral to our clinic. These procedures ...

Last Updated: 20 Sep 2013

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[Palpebral ptosis, a rare ocular manifestation of Crohn's disease].
 

Author(s): A Ruiz Serrato, D Marín García, M A Guerrero León, M J Vallejo Herrera, J Villar Jiménez, F Cárdenas Lafuente, M A García Ordóñez

Journal: Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol. 2013 Aug;88(8):323-6.

 

An 18 year-old-woman presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea, and ptosis in her left eye. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) and the study of cerebrospinal fluid detected no abnormalities. Colonoscopy revealed a Crohn's disease (CD) confirmed by histological examination of ...

Last Updated: 26 Jul 2013

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Ptosis" returned 6 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Oculopalpebral and facial synkinesis associated with ptosis: epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic features].
 

Author(s): N Ben Rayana, F Ben Hadj Hamida, F Touzani, N Chahed, L Knani, F Krifa, S Yakoubi, H Mahjoub

Journal: J Fr Ophtalmol. 2011 Feb;34(2):95-107.

 

Synkinetic movements of the upper eyelids may be noted in association with movements of either extraocular muscles or other muscles of the face. Patients with oculopalpebral or facial-palpebral synkinesis may also have ptosis of the involved eyelid. The clinical and therapeutic features ...

Last Updated: 21 Feb 2011

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[Surgical treatment of acquired myogenic eyelid ptosis].
 

Author(s): E M Becerra, G Blanco, Y Muiños, C Bianciotto

Journal: Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol. 2005 Jun;80(6):359-64.

 

To report the surgical outcome of aponeurosis surgery in patients with acquired myogenic eyelid ptosis and describe surgical guidelines for their correction.

Last Updated: 29 Jun 2005

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The use of apraclonidine eyedrops to treat ptosis after the administration of botulinum toxin to the upper face.
 

Author(s): Noah Scheinfeld

Journal:

 

A side effect of the injection of botulinum toxin into the upper third of the face is ptosis or lid droop. A therapy recommended to treat ptosis resulting from administration of botulinum toxins A and B is Iopidine (apraclonidine 0.5 %) eye drops. Apraclonidine is an alpha2-adrenergic ...

Last Updated: 7 Mar 2005

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 2 Feb 2009

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Study of the Elevate Anterior and Apical Prolapse Repair System Compared to Native Tissue Repair for Pelvic Organ Prolapse
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Anterior Pelvic Organ Prolapse; Apical Pelvic Organ Prolapse

 

Last Updated: 24 Jun 2014

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Study of the Elevate Apical and Posterior Prolapse Repair System Compared to Native Tissue Repair for Pelvic Organ Prolapse
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Posterior Pelvic Organ Prolapse; Posterior and Apical Pelvic Organ Prolapse

 

Last Updated: 24 Jun 2014

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