Pelvic floor dysfunction

Common Name(s)

Pelvic floor dysfunction

Pelvic floor dysfunction is not a single condition, but a term used to refer to multiple complications that affect the pelvic floor, pelvic bones, or lower back. The conditions may be caused by genetically weakened bones or muscle fibers, but other causes such as obesity, menopause, pregnancy, and childbirth have also been identified. Pelvic floor dysfunction may also be caused by tightening (or inability to properly relax) of the pelvic floor muscles. This form of pelvic floor dysfunction causes constipation, or even an inability to control bowel movements.

Diagnosis of pelvic floor dysfunction may be done through a combination of looking at the individual's medical history and use of a defecating proctogram, in which the patient is given an enema and an x-ray records the flow of the liquid through the rectum. Treatment may be done through pelvic floor exercises (Kegel exercises) if the condition is mild, biofeedback techniques to aid in muscle coordination, or surgery may be required. In the case of pelvic floor dysfunction caused by tightening of the muscles, physical therapy may be an effective treatment. Talk to your doctor if you think you may have a pelvic floor dysfunction to find the right treatment option for you.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Pelvic floor dysfunction" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Pelvic floor dysfunction" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

http://www.agmd-gimotility.org

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Pelvic floor dysfunction" returned 29 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Multivariate analysis for pelvic floor dysfunction].
 

Author(s): Yingjie Bao, Mengcai Hu, Guixiang Gao, Jie Huang, Zhihong Zhang

Journal: Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban. 2015 Nov;40(11):1229-33.

 

To investigate the risky factors for pelvic floor functional disorder.


Last Updated: 8 Dec 2015

Go To URL
Do Obstetrical Providers, Counsel Women About Postpartum Pelvic Floor Dysfunction?
 

Author(s): Sybil G Dessie, Michele R Hacker, Laura E Dodge, Eman A Elkadry

Journal: J Reprod Med. ;60(5-6):205-10.

 

To assess prenatal counseling practices of obstetrics providers related to postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction at centers with integrated urogynecology services.

Last Updated: 1 Jul 2015

Go To URL
Association of compartment defects in anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction with female outlet obstruction constipation (OOC) by dynamic MR defecography.
 

Author(s): M Li, T Jiang, P Peng, X-Q Yang, W-C Wang

Journal: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2015 Apr;19(8):1407-15.

 

Chronic constipation affects more than 17% of the global population worldwide, and up to 50% of patients were outlet obstruction constipation (OOC). Women and the elderly are most likely to be affected, due to female-specific risk factors, such as menopause, parity and multiparity. ...

Last Updated: 13 May 2015

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Pelvic floor dysfunction" returned 9 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Pelvic floor dysfunction, and effects of pregnancy and mode of delivery on pelvic floor.
 

Author(s): Murat Bozkurt, Ayşe Ender Yumru, Levent Şahin

Journal: Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Dec;53(4):452-8.

 

Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), although seems to be simple, is a complex process that develops secondary to multifactorial factors. The incidence of PFD is increasing with increasing life expectancy. PFD is a term that refers to a broad range of clinical scenarios, including lower ...

Last Updated: 16 Dec 2014

Go To URL
Association between mode of delivery and pelvic floor dysfunction.
 

Author(s): Guri Rørtveit, Yngvild S Hannestad

Journal:

 

Normal vaginal delivery can cause significant strain on the pelvic floor. We present a review of the current knowledge on vaginal delivery as a risk factor for urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse compared to caesarean section.

Last Updated: 15 Oct 2014

Go To URL
Pelvic floor and sexual male dysfunction.
 

Author(s): Antonella Pischedda, Ferdinando Fusco, Andrea Curreli, Giovanni Grimaldi, Furio Pirozzi Farina

Journal:

 

The pelvic floor is a complex multifunctional structure that corresponds to the genito-urinary-anal area and consists of muscle and connective tissue. It supports the urinary, fecal, sexual and reproductive functions and pelvic statics. The symptoms caused by pelvic floor dysfunction ...

Last Updated: 22 May 2013

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in Genetics Home Reference.

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Web-based Validation Pelvic Floor Questionnaires
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

 

Last Updated: 25 Mar 2016

Go to URL
Effect of Brief-tele Support on Attendance at Physiotherapy Sessions
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions

 

Last Updated: 12 Apr 2016

Go to URL
Outcomes of Delivery in Patients With Dyspareunia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Dyspareunia; Pregnancy; Provoked Vestibulodynia; Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

 

Last Updated: 21 Feb 2016

Go to URL