Osteomalacia

Common Name(s)

Osteomalacia

Osteomalacia is a disease that causes softening of the bones in adults. When this disease occurs in children, it is known as rickets. Soft bones are much more prone to breaking or bending than hardened bones. This leads to increased risk of broken bones (fractures) and increased risk of falls, especially in older adults. Vitamin D deficiency is usually the cause of osteomalacia. Our bodies need vitamin D to absorb calcium from the foods we eat. Without vitamin D, our bodies do not get enough calcium for our bones and this causes the bones to become softened.

There are usually no symptoms in the early stages of osteomalacia. However, changes in the bones can usually be seen on x-ray images. As the disease progresses, symptoms include dull, aching bone pain and muscle weakness. Osteomalacia occurs as a result of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency can develop as a result of surgery to the stomach or small intestine, disorders of the kidneys or liver, celiac disease, and some drugs used to treat seizures. People who have a lack of vitamin D in their diets or who have very little exposure to sunlight are also at risk for osteomalacia, as well as those of South Asian origin.

Osteomalacia is most often diagnosed through x-ray imaging, blood tests, or a bone biopsy. Treatment for osteomalacia involves increasing vitamin D and calcium intake, sometimes in the form of dietary supplements. Support groups are available as a resource for more information.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Osteomalacia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Osteomalacia" returned 282 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Bilateral Femoral Neck Fatigue Fracture due to Osteomalacia Secondary to Celiac Disease: Report of Three Cases.
 

Author(s): Ozgur Selek, Kaya Memisoglu, Alev Selek

Journal: Arch Iran Med. 2015 Aug;18(8):542-4.

 

Bilateral non traumatic femoral neck fatigue fracture is a rare condition usually occurring secondary to medical conditions such as pregnancy, pelvic irradiation, corticosteroid exposure, chronic renal failure and osteomalacia. In this report, we present three young female patients ...

Last Updated: 12 Aug 2015

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Surgical treatment of tumor-induced osteomalacia: a retrospective review of 40 cases with extremity tumors.
 

Author(s): Zhi-jian Sun, Jin Jin, Gui-xing Qiu, Peng Gao, Yong Liu

Journal:

 

Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare syndrome typically caused by mesenchymal tumors. It has been shown that complete tumor resection may be curative. However, to our knowledge, there has been no report of a large cohort to exam different surgical approaches. This study was ...

Last Updated: 17 Apr 2015

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Osteomalacia, severe thoracic deformities and respiratory failure in a young woman with anorexia nervosa.
 

Author(s): Daisuke Watanabe, Mari Hotta, Atsuhiro Ichihara

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2015 ;54(8):929-34.

 

The recent trends in avoiding sunbathing and eating fewer fish products have resulted in a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the general Japanese population. We herein report the case of a young woman with enduring anorexia nervosa (AN) who suffered from osteomalacia, thoracic ...

Last Updated: 16 Apr 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Osteomalacia" returned 17 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Hypophosphatemic osteomalacia due to drug-induced Fanconi's syndrome associated with adefovir dipivoxil treatment for hepatitis B.
 

Author(s): Hiroyuki Eguchi, Munehisa Tsuruta, Junichi Tani, Reiichiro Kuwahara, Yuji Hiromatsu

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2014 ;53(3):233-7.

 

We herein present the case of a 58-year-old Japanese man with Fanconi's syndrome with a 13-month history of bone pain in his ribs, hips, knees and ankles. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) for the treatment of lamivudine-resistant chronic hepatitis B virus infection ...

Last Updated: 4 Feb 2014

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Osteocyte regulation of phosphate homeostasis and bone mineralization underlies the pathophysiology of the heritable disorders of rickets and osteomalacia.
 

Author(s): Jian Q Feng, Erica L Clinkenbeard, Baozhi Yuan, Kenneth E White, Marc K Drezner

Journal: Bone. 2013 Jun;54(2):213-21.

 

Although recent studies have established that osteocytes function as secretory cells that regulate phosphate metabolism, the biomolecular mechanism(s) underlying these effects remain incompletely defined. However, investigations focusing on the pathogenesis of X-linked hypophosphatemia ...

Last Updated: 10 Apr 2013

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[Itai-itai disease: cadmium-induced renal tubular osteomalacia].
 

Author(s): Keiko Aoshima

Journal: Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. 2012 ;67(4):455-63.

 

Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic elements to which humans could be exposed at work or in the environment. The outbreak of itai-itai disease, which is the most severe stage of chronic Cd poisoning, occurred in the Cd-polluted Jinzu River basin in Toyama. In this area, the river ...

Last Updated: 25 Oct 2012

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in Oncogenic Osteomalacia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Oncogenic Osteomalacia; Mesenchymal Tumor

 

Last Updated: 13 Jan 2015

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Study of KRN23 in Adult Subjects With Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia (TIO) or Epidermal Nevus Syndrome (ENS)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Tumor Induced Osteomalacia (TIO); Epidermal Nevus Syndrome (ENS)

 

Last Updated: 17 Sep 2015

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Last Updated: 5 Jan 2015

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