Ollier disease

Common Name(s)

Ollier disease, Enchondromatosis

Ollier disease, also known as enchondromatosis, is a disorder that leads to the growth of non-cancerous tumors in cartilage. Cartilage is a type of tissue that is found inside of bones and is involved in bone growth. The most common location where Ollier disease develops is the long bones of the body, specifically in the arms and legs. Although less common, tumors can also grow in the pelvic bone, ribs, breastbone, and skull. Tumors form when a change (mutation) in DNA causes certain cells to grow out of control, resulting in the formation of a mass or a lump.

Ollier disease is present from the time of birth, and symptoms usually first appear between the ages of 1 and 10. The most common signs of Ollier disease include short limbs and bowing, or bending, of long bones which may cause difficulty walking. This disorder may cause problems with bone growth, which may result in pain and frequent fractures in the affected areas. Diagnosis may involve a physical exam, imaging studies, and other laboratory studies such as bone scans.

Treatment for Ollier disease depends on many factors such as how large the tumors are and their locations in the body. If you or a family member has been diagnosed with Ollier disease, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options. Support groups are also available for more resources and information.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Ollier disease" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Ollier disease" returned 11 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Clinical images: enchondromatosis (Ollier disease).
 

Author(s): Milena Cerny, Hannes A Rudiger, Berengere Aubry-Rozier, Eric Dugert, Fabio Becce

Journal: Arthritis Rheum.. 2013 Nov;65(11):2886.

 

Last Updated: 29 Oct 2013

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Incidence, predictive factors, and prognosis of chondrosarcoma in patients with Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome: an international multicenter study of 161 patients.
 

Author(s): Suzan H M Verdegaal, Judith V M G Bovée, Twinkal C Pansuriya, Robert J Grimer, Harzem Ozger, Paul C Jutte, Mikel San Julian, David J Biau, Ingrid C M van der Geest, Andreas Leithner, Arne Streitbürger, Frank M Klenke, Francois G Gouin, Domenico A Campanacci, Perrine Marec-Berard, Pancras C W Hogendoorn, Ronald Brand, Antonie H M Taminiau

Journal: Oncologist. 2011 ;16(12):1771-9.

 

Enchondromatosis is characterized by the presence of multiple benign cartilage lesions in bone. While Ollier disease is typified by multiple enchondromas, in Maffucci syndrome these are associated with hemangiomas. Studies evaluating the predictive value of clinical symptoms for development ...

Last Updated: 2 Jan 2012

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Somatic mosaic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are associated with enchondroma and spindle cell hemangioma in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome.
 

Author(s): Twinkal C Pansuriya, Ronald van Eijk, Pio d'Adamo, Maayke A J H van Ruler, Marieke L Kuijjer, Jan Oosting, Anne-Marie Cleton-Jansen, Jolieke G van Oosterwijk, Sofie L J Verbeke, Daniëlle Meijer, Tom van Wezel, Karolin H Nord, Luca Sangiorgi, Berkin Toker, Bernadette Liegl-Atzwanger, Mikel San-Julian, Raf Sciot, Nisha Limaye, Lars-Gunnar Kindblom, Soeren Daugaard, Catherine Godfraind, Laurence M Boon, Miikka Vikkula, Kyle C Kurek, Karoly Szuhai, Pim J French, Judith V M G Bovée

Journal:

 

Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are non-hereditary skeletal disorders characterized by multiple enchondromas (Ollier disease) combined with spindle cell hemangiomas (Maffucci syndrome). We report somatic heterozygous mutations in IDH1 (c.394C>T encoding an R132C substitution ...

Last Updated: 28 Nov 2011

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Ollier disease" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Ollier disease.
 

Author(s): Caroline Silve, Harald Jüppner

Journal:

 

Enchondromas are common intraosseous, usually benign cartilaginous tumors, that develop in close proximity to growth plate cartilage. When multiple enchondromas are present, the condition is called enchondromatosis also known as Ollier disease (WHO terminology). The estimated prevalence ...

Last Updated: 9 Oct 2006

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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