Anthrax

Common Name(s)

Anthrax

Anthrax is a sickness caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Although anthrax is mostly seen in livestock and wild game, humans can be affected too through contact with sick animals. Anthrax can be passed through open skin wounds, consuming the bacteria, or inhaling it. Symptoms vary from skin sores and nausea to shock. Anthrax can be treated with antibiotics, however inhalation of the bacteria is more serious and sometimes fatal. If you or a family member has been diagnosed with anthrax, talk with your doctor about the most current treatment options available.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Anthrax" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Anthrax" returned 495 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene (ANTXR2).
 

Author(s): T Karaderi, S M Keidel, J J Pointon, L H Appleton, M A Brown, D M Evans, B P Wordsworth

Journal: Ann. Rheum. Dis.. 2014 Nov;73(11):2054-8.

 

ANTXR2 variants have been associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in two previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (p∼9×10(-8)). However, a genome-wide significant association (p<5×10(-8)) was not observed. We conducted a more comprehensive analysis of ANTXR2 in an independent ...

Last Updated: 7 Oct 2014

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Protective antigen-specific memory B cells persist years after anthrax vaccination and correlate with humoral immunity.
 

Author(s): Lori Garman, Kenneth Smith, A Darise Farris, Michael R Nelson, Renata J M Engler, Judith A James

Journal:

 

Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA) generates short-lived protective antigen (PA) specific IgG that correlates with in vitro toxin neutralization and protection from Bacillus anthracis challenge. Animal studies suggest that when PA-specific IgG has waned, survival after spore challenge ...

Last Updated: 15 Aug 2014

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Serum adenosine deaminase activity in cutaneous anthrax.
 

Author(s): Mahmut Sunnetcioglu, Sevdegul Karadas, Mehmet Aslan, Mehmet Resat Ceylan, Halit Demir, Mehmet Resit Oncu, Mustafa Kasım Karahocagil, Aysel Sunnetcioglu, Cenk Aypak

Journal:

 

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity has been discovered in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data associated with cutaneous anthrax. The aim of this study was to investigate serum ADA activity in patients with cutaneous anthrax.

Last Updated: 7 Jul 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Anthrax" returned 56 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Injectional anthrax - new presentation of an old disease.
 

Author(s): T Berger, M Kassirer, A A Aran

Journal:

 

Bacillus anthracis infection (anthrax) has three distinct clinical presentations depending on the route of exposure: cutaneous, gastrointestinal and inhalational anthrax. Each of these can lead to secondary bacteraemia and anthrax meningitis. Since 2009,anthrax has emerged among heroin ...

Last Updated: 20 Aug 2014

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Designing inhibitors of anthrax toxin.
 

Author(s): Ekaterina M Nestorovich, Sergey M Bezrukov

Journal: Expert Opin Drug Discov. 2014 Mar;9(3):299-318.

 

Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded 'for the development of multiscale ...

Last Updated: 21 Feb 2014

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Molecular determinants for a cardiovascular collapse in anthrax.
 

Author(s): Jurgen Brojatsch, Arturo Casadevall, David L Goldman

Journal:

 

Bacillus anthracis releases two bipartite proteins, lethal toxin and edema factor, that contribute significantly to the progression of anthrax-associated shock. As blocking the anthrax toxins prevents disease, the toxins are considered the main virulence factors of the bacterium. ...

Last Updated: 6 Jan 2014

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Glyburide Advantage in Malignant Edema and Stroke - Remedy Pharmaceuticals
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Ischemic Stroke; Malignant Edema

 

Last Updated: 3 Jun 2014

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Pharmacokinetics of Understudied Drugs Administered to Children Per Standard of Care
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Infection; Hypertension; Anesthesia; Pain; Reflux; Nausea; Edema; Hyperlipidemia; Hypotension; Hypercholesterolemia; Sedation; Anxiolysis; Benzodiazepine Withdrawal; Bipolar Disorder; Autistic Disorder; Schizophrenia; Influenza Treatment or Prophylaxis; Acute Decompensated Heart Failure; Stable Angina; Life-threatening Fungal Infections; Nosocomial Pneumonia; Community Acquired Pneumonia; Acute Bacterial Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis; Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Uncomplicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis; Complicated Urinary Tract Infections; Acute Pyelonephritis; Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections; Inhalational Anthrax (Post-Exposure); Infantile Hemangioma

 

Last Updated: 27 Feb 2015

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