Mycobacterium Marinum

Common Name(s)

Mycobacterium Marinum

Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum) is a bacterium commonly found in bodies of fresh or salt water (aquatic environments). Humans can become infected by M. marinum after exposure to infected aquatic environments or animals. The bacteria enter the body through skin scrapes or cuts. This infection typically causes a red or tan skin bump called a granuloma. Diagnosis of this infection is often delayed because of its rarity. Some infections may become better on their own without treatment, however treatment by oral antibiotics is also available. A mycobacterium marinum infection may also be called aquarium granuloma and fish tank granuloma.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Mycobacterium Marinum" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Mycobacterium Marinum" returned 63 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Mycobacterium marinum infection following contact with reptiles: vivarium granuloma.
 

Author(s): Mehdi Bouricha, Bernard Castan, Elisabeth Duchene-Parisi, Michel Drancourt

Journal: Int. J. Infect. Dis.. 2014 Apr;21():17-8.

 

A 19-year-old man presented with a 1.5-cm nodule on the first dorsal metacarpal ray. The patient denied having contact with fish tanks or fish, but recalled handling many reptiles without gloves in the vivarium where he worked. A culture of a skin biopsy specimen yielded Mycobacterium ...

Last Updated: 31 Mar 2014

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Fish tank granuloma caused by Mycobacterium marinum in two aquarists: two case reports.
 

Author(s): Michal Slany, Petr Jezek, Monika Bodnarova

Journal: Biomed Res Int. 2013 ;2013():161329.

 

Mycobacterium marinum, the cause of chronic systemic infections in fish, occasionally causes granulomatous skin and soft tissue lesions in humans. Cutaneous mycobacterial infection in two patients owing to unusual circumstances is presented in this report. The first patient was infected ...

Last Updated: 6 Jan 2014

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Mycobacterium marinum: a potential immunotherapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.
 

Author(s): Wei-wei Tian, Qian-qiu Wang, Wei-da Liu, Jian-ping Shen, Hong-sheng Wang

Journal:

 

The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium marinum infection in vitro and the potential of M. marinum as an immunotherapy for M. tuberculosis infection.

Last Updated: 9 Aug 2013

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Mycobacterium Marinum" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Review article: Mycobacterium marinum infection of the hand and wrist.
 

Author(s): Jason Pui-yin Cheung, Boris Fung, Samson Sai-yin Wong, Wing-yuk Ip

Journal: J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). 2010 Apr;18(1):98-103.

 

Misdiagnosis and delayed treatment of Mycobacterium marinum infection is common because of its diverse manifestations. This leads to inappropriate use of antimicrobials, extension of the infection from the skin to the tenosynovium, and a poor prognosis (loss of tendons and prolonged ...

Last Updated: 29 Apr 2010

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Incubation period and sources of exposure for cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection: case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): J A Jernigan, B M Farr

Journal: Clin. Infect. Dis.. 2000 Aug;31(2):439-43.

 

The diagnosis of cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection is often delayed for months after presentation, perhaps because important clinical clues in the patient's history are frequently overlooked. Knowledge of the incubation period allows the clinician to target questions about ...

Last Updated: 7 Dec 2000

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Mycobacterium marinum infections in man.
 

Author(s): C H Collins, J M Grange, W C Noble, M D Yates

Journal: J Hyg (Lond). 1985 Apr;94(2):135-49.

 

Last Updated: 28 May 1985

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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