Mycobacterium Marinum

Common Name(s)

Mycobacterium Marinum

Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum) is a bacterium commonly found in bodies of fresh or salt water (aquatic environments). Humans can become infected by M. marinum after exposure to infected aquatic environments or animals. The bacteria enter the body through skin scrapes or cuts. This infection typically causes a red or tan skin bump called a granuloma. Diagnosis of this infection is often delayed because of its rarity. Some infections may become better on their own without treatment, however treatment by oral antibiotics is also available. A mycobacterium marinum infection may also be called aquarium granuloma and fish tank granuloma.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Mycobacterium Marinum" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Mycobacterium Marinum" returned 77 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Evaluation of the SLOMYCO Sensititre(®) panel for testing the antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycobacterium marinum isolates.
 

Author(s): Marion Chazel, Hélène Marchandin, Nicolas Keck, Dominique Terru, Christian Carrière, Michael Ponsoda, Véronique Jacomo, Gilles Panteix, Nicolas Bouzinbi, Anne-Laure Bañuls, Marc Choisy, Jérôme Solassol, Alexandra Aubry, Sylvain Godreuil

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The agar dilution method is currently considered as the reference method for Mycobacterium marinum drug susceptibility testing (DST). As it is time-consuming, alternative methods, such as the E-test, were evaluated for M. marinum DST, but without success. The SLOMYCO Sensititre(®) ...

Last Updated: 6 May 2016

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Disseminated Mycobacterium marinum Infection With a Destructive Nasal Lesion Mimicking Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report.
 

Author(s): Takanori Asakura, Makoto Ishii, Taku Kikuchi, Kaori Kameyama, Ho Namkoong, Noboru Nakata, Kayoko Sugita, Sadatomo Tasaka, Takayuki Shimizu, Yoshihiko Hoshino, Shinichiro Okamoto, Tomoko Betsuyaku, Naoki Hasegawa

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Mar;95(11):e3131.

 

Mycobacterium marinum is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that mainly causes skin infection in immunocompetent patients, and its disseminated infection is rare. Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL) usually localizes at the nasal and/or paranasal area, but occasionally ...

Last Updated: 18 Mar 2016

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Genome-wide transposon mutagenesis indicates that Mycobacterium marinum customizes its virulence mechanisms for survival and replication in different hosts.
 

Author(s): Eveline M Weerdenburg, Abdallah M Abdallah, Farania Rangkuti, Moataz Abd El Ghany, Thomas D Otto, Sabir A Adroub, Douwe Molenaar, Roy Ummels, Kars Ter Veen, Gunny van Stempvoort, Astrid M van der Sar, Shahjahan Ali, Gemma C Langridge, Nicholas R Thomson, Arnab Pain, Wilbert Bitter

Journal: Infect. Immun.. 2015 May;83(5):1778-88.

 

The interaction of environmental bacteria with unicellular eukaryotes is generally considered a major driving force for the evolution of intracellular pathogens, allowing them to survive and replicate in phagocytic cells of vertebrate hosts. To test this hypothesis on a genome-wide ...

Last Updated: 16 Apr 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Mycobacterium Marinum" returned 4 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Review article: Mycobacterium marinum infection of the hand and wrist.
 

Author(s): Jason Pui-yin Cheung, Boris Fung, Samson Sai-yin Wong, Wing-yuk Ip

Journal: J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). 2010 Apr;18(1):98-103.

 

Misdiagnosis and delayed treatment of Mycobacterium marinum infection is common because of its diverse manifestations. This leads to inappropriate use of antimicrobials, extension of the infection from the skin to the tenosynovium, and a poor prognosis (loss of tendons and prolonged ...

Last Updated: 29 Apr 2010

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Disseminated Mycobacterium marinum infection with extensive cutaneous eruption and bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.
 

Author(s): Markus Streit, Lorenz M Böhlen, Thomas Hunziker, Stefan Zimmerli, Gion G Tscharner, Helga Nievergelt, Thomas Bodmer, Lasse R Braathen

Journal: Eur J Dermatol. ;16(1):79-83.

 

Mycobacterium marinum can cause fish tank granuloma (or swimming pool or aquarium granuloma) in immunocompetent patients. Dissemination of Mycobacterium marinum-infection is a rare condition which occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients and can be life-threatening. We report the ...

Last Updated: 26 Jan 2006

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Incubation period and sources of exposure for cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection: case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): J A Jernigan, B M Farr

Journal: Clin. Infect. Dis.. 2000 Aug;31(2):439-43.

 

The diagnosis of cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection is often delayed for months after presentation, perhaps because important clinical clues in the patient's history are frequently overlooked. Knowledge of the incubation period allows the clinician to target questions about ...

Last Updated: 7 Dec 2000

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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