Mycobacterium fortuitum

Common Name(s)

Mycobacterium fortuitum

Mycobacterium fortuitum is a type of fast-growing bacteria (nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM)). This bacterium can be found in water, dirt, and sewage, and is not limited to a particular geographical area. Infection typically occurs when the bacteria enters wounds, sometimes after surgery. Individuals who have suppressed immune systems are at the highest risk of being infected.

Symptoms of infection with mycobacterium fortuitum vary based on the location of infection but generally include fever, night sweats, tiredness, and weight loss. This infection can also cause lung disease with a chronic cough. Other symptoms include skin disease appearing poorly healing wounds, inflammation of bones (osteomyelitis), joint infections, or eye disease. In individuals with suppressed immune systems, an infection may lead to infection of the heart tissue or valves (endocarditis).

Mycobacterium fortuitum infection can be diagnosed using a sputum sample, which involves coughing deeply to expel the sputum, or using another sample from the affected tissue. A swab from the infected area will be grown (cultured) to look for the presence of mycobacterium fortuitum. This is important in order to eliminate fungus as a possible cause of infection, especially if the individual has respiratory symptoms. A confirmed mycobacterium fortuitum infection is treated with antibiotics. If you have been diagnosed with a mycobacterium fortuitum infection, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options. Support groups are available for more information and resources.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Mycobacterium fortuitum" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Mycobacterium fortuitum" returned 75 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Natural history of Mycobacterium fortuitum pulmonary infection presenting with migratory infiltrates: a case report with microbiological analysis.
 

Author(s): Satoshi Okamori, Takanori Asakura, Tomoyasu Nishimura, Eiko Tamizu, Makoto Ishii, Mitsunori Yoshida, Hanako Fukano, Yuichiro Hayashi, Masaki Fujita, Yoshihiko Hoshino, Tomoko Betsuyaku, Naoki Hasegawa

Journal:

 

Presence of Mycobacterium fortuitum in respiratory tracts usually indicates mere colonization or transient infection, whereas true pulmonary infection occurs in patients with gastroesophageal disease. However, little is known about the diagnostic indications for true M. fortuitum ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Efficacy of calcium hypochlorite and ultraviolet irradiation against and .
 

Author(s): E A Roshani Edirisinghe, D R Anuruddhika Dissanayake, Charmalie L Abayasekera, Appudurai Arulkanthan

Journal: Int J Mycobacteriol. ;6(3):311-314.

 

Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause opportunistic infections with increasing frequency in immunocompromised humans. Water is one of the natural sources for transmission of NTM and plays a major role in the epidemiology of NTM infections. This study evaluated the efficacy of calcium ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Septicemia and pneumonia due to Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in a patient with extronodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type: A case report.
 

Author(s): Jia Cong, Chenxi Wang, Li Ma, Shaoya Zhang, Jingwen Wang

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 May;96(18):e6800.

 

Mycobacterium fortuitum (M.fortuitum) is one of the rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) that is widespread in the environment. M.fortuitum can cause different types of disease including pulmonary disease, lymphadenitis, cutaneous disease, and disseminated disease. However, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Mycobacterium fortuitum" returned 9 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Mycobacterium fortuitum as a cause of peritoneal dialysis catheter port infection. A clinical case and a review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Ana Belén Martínez López, Olalla Álvarez Blanco, María Jesús Ruíz Serrano, María Dolores Morales San-José, Augusto Luque de Pablos

Journal: Nefrologia. ;35(6):584-6.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Mycobacterium fortuitum breast abscess after nipple piercing.
 

Author(s): Khurram Abbass, Muhammad K Adnan, Ronald J Markert, Mimi Emig, Nasir A Khan

Journal: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):51-2.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Mycobacterium fortuitum as a cause of peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis: case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Simon H Jiang, Darren M Roberts, Andrew H Dawson, Meg Jardine

Journal:

 

Peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis (PD-peritonitis) due to Mycobacterium spp is uncommon. Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium (NTB) PD-peritonitis can present in a similar fashion to more common causes of bacterial PD-peritonitis. We describe the first reported case of multiresistant ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.