Multiple hereditary exostoses

Common Name(s)

Multiple hereditary exostoses

Description for this condition is not yet available.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Multiple hereditary exostoses" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
MHE and Me

MHE and Me is the member branch of the MHE Coalition, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, dedicated to children with this rare bone disorder and their families. Through the Bumpy Bone Club, information and support are provided to children through membership packages mailed to children, teens and young adults; online support; gatherings of families, and the We Care program, which provides gift packages to children undergoing surgery, as well as to their siblings. Children are encouraged to participate in the Bumpy Bone Club Magazine, and to tell their stories on our website.

Last Updated: 1 May 2013

View Details
Logo
MHE Coalition

The MHE Coalition provides support and information to those diagnosed with MHE/MO/HME. In addition, by funding and participating in research, awarding educational grants for qualified orthopedic residents to attend the prestigious Annual Baltimore Limb Deformity Course, and by working with our members and members of the medical and scientific communities, our organization is committed to finding ways to improve quality of life for those living with this rare bone disorder. Through MHE and Me we provide information, programs and support to children, teens and young adults with the disorder.

Last Updated: 26 Mar 2013

View Details
MHE Research Foundation

The MHE Research Foundation is a nonprofit organization for researchers, families and physicians dealing with Multiple Hereditary Exostoses, a rare genetic bone disease. The MHE Research Foundation five point mission is to REACH, advance and support research, education, and advocacy, in order to bring hope to families affected by this disease.

Last Updated: 2 Dec 2009

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Multiple hereditary exostoses" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
MHE and Me

MHE and Me is the member branch of the MHE Coalition, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, dedicated to children with this rare bone disorder and their families. Through the Bumpy Bone Club, information and support are provided to children through membership packages mailed to children, teens and young adults; online support; gatherings of families, and the We Care program, which provides gift packages to children undergoing surgery, as well as to their siblings. Children are encouraged to participate in the Bumpy Bone Club Magazine, and to tell their stories on our website.

http://www.mheandme.com

Last Updated: 1 May 2013

View Details
Logo
MHE Coalition

The MHE Coalition provides support and information to those diagnosed with MHE/MO/HME. In addition, by funding and participating in research, awarding educational grants for qualified orthopedic residents to attend the prestigious Annual Baltimore Limb Deformity Course, and by working with our members and members of the medical and scientific communities, our organization is committed to finding ways to improve quality of life for those living with this rare bone disorder. Through MHE and Me we provide information, programs and support to children, teens and young adults with the disorder.

http://www.mhecoalition.org

Last Updated: 26 Mar 2013

View Details
MHE Research Foundation

The MHE Research Foundation is a nonprofit organization for researchers, families and physicians dealing with Multiple Hereditary Exostoses, a rare genetic bone disease. The MHE Research Foundation five point mission is to REACH, advance and support research, education, and advocacy, in order to bring hope to families affected by this disease.

http://www.mheresearchfoundation.org

Last Updated: 2 Dec 2009

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Multiple hereditary exostoses" returned 41 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[A splicing mutation of EXT1 in a Chinese pedigree with hereditary multiple exostoses].
 

Author(s): Wei Wang, Zheng-Qing Qiu, Hong-Mei Song

Journal: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2014 Feb;16(2):174-80.

 

Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) is an autosomal dominant monogenic disorder of paraplasia ossium. Mutations in EXT1 and EXT2 have been suggested to be responsible for over 70% of HME cases. This study aimed to analyze the clinical features and pathogenic mutations in a Chinese ...

Last Updated: 26 Feb 2014

Go To URL
Gradual lengthening of the ulna in patients with multiple hereditary exostoses with a dislocated radial head.
 

Author(s): Yong Jin Cho, Sung Taek Jung

Journal: Yonsei Med. J.. 2014 Jan;55(1):178-84.

 

Multiple hereditary exostoses of the forearm typically form in the distal ulna, causing disturbances in the growth of the ulna and functional disability. Multiple hereditary exostoses inhibit the growth of the ulna, leading to an acquisition of a varus deformity in the radius, which ...

Last Updated: 16 Dec 2013

Go To URL
Multimodality imaging features of hereditary multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): H K Kok, L Fitzgerald, N Campbell, I D Lyburn, P L Munk, O Buckley, W C Torreggiani

Journal: Br J Radiol. 2013 Oct;86(1030):20130398.

 

Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) or diaphyseal aclasis is an inherited disorder characterised by the formation of multiple osteochondromas, which are cartilage-capped osseous outgrowths, and the development of associated osseous deformities. Individuals with HME may be asymptomatic ...

Last Updated: 20 Sep 2013

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Multiple hereditary exostoses" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Heparan sulfate in skeletal development, growth, and pathology: the case of hereditary multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): Julianne Huegel, Federica Sgariglia, Motomi Enomoto-Iwamoto, Eiki Koyama, John P Dormans, Maurizio Pacifici

Journal: Dev. Dyn.. 2013 Sep;242(9):1021-32.

 

Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans. Due to their sulfation patterns, the HS chains interact with numerous signaling proteins and regulate their distribution and activity on target cells. Many of these proteins, including ...

Last Updated: 21 Aug 2013

Go To URL
Glycobiology and the growth plate: current concepts in multiple hereditary exostoses.
 

Author(s): Kevin B Jones

Journal: J Pediatr Orthop. ;31(5):577-86.

 

Multiple hereditary exostoses, also termed as multiple osteochondromas, is a heritable disorder of connective tissue with primarily orthopaedic clinical manifestations. Understanding of its biological underpinnings has been advanced on a variety of fronts in recent years.

Last Updated: 9 Jun 2011

Go To URL
Acetabular dysplasia associated with hereditary multiple exostoses. A case report.
 

Author(s): N A Felix, J M Mazur, E A Loveless

Journal: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2000 May;82(4):555-7.

 

Hereditary multiple exostoses is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by multiple osteochondromata, most commonly affecting the forearm, knee and ankle. Osteochondromata of the proximal femur have been reported to occur in 30% to 90% of affected patients with coxa valga in ...

Last Updated: 29 Jun 2000

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.