Monilethrix

Common Name(s)

Monilethrix

Monilethrix is a rare condition caused by a defect in the hair shaft resulting in hair which appears dry, dull, and brittle, and which breaks spontaneously or with mild trauma.  The age of onset, severity, and course may vary from person to person.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Monilethrix" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Monilethrix" returned 12 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Mutation detection of type II hair cortex keratin gene KRT86 in a Chinese Han family with congenital monilethrix.
 

Author(s): Zhen-zhen Ye, Xu Nan, Hong-shan Zhao, Xue-rong Chen, Qing-hua Song

Journal: Chin. Med. J.. 2013 Aug;126(16):3103-6.

 

Monilethrix is an autosomal dominant hair disorder characterized clinically by alopecia and follicular papules. In this study, we collected a Han monilethrix family to detect the mutations in patients and investigated the correlation between the genotype and phenotype of monilethrix.

Last Updated: 28 Aug 2013

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More than one gene involved in monilethrix: intracellular but also extracellular players.
 

Author(s): Jurgen Schweizer

Journal: J. Invest. Dermatol.. 2006 Jun;126(6):1216-9.

 

Monilethrix, an autosomal dominant human hair disorder, is caused by mutations in three type II hair cortex keratins. Rare cases of the disease with non-vertical transmission have now been found to overlap with localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis. The underlying gene, desmoglein ...

Last Updated: 16 May 2006

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An autosomal recessive form of monilethrix is caused by mutations in DSG4: clinical overlap with localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis.
 

Author(s): Abraham Zlotogorski, Dina Marek, Liran Horev, Almogit Abu, Dan Ben-Amitai, Liora Gerad, Arieh Ingber, Moshe Frydman, Haike Reznik-Wolf, Daniel A Vardy, Elon Pras

Journal: J. Invest. Dermatol.. 2006 Jun;126(6):1292-6.

 

Monilethrix is a structural defect of the hair shaft usually inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and caused by mutations in the hHb1, hHb3, and hHb6 keratin genes. Autosomal recessive inheritance in this disease has been sporadically reported. We encountered 12 Jewish families ...

Last Updated: 16 May 2006

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Monilethrix" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.