Melorheostosis

Common Name(s)

Melorheostosis

Melorheostosis is a progressive skeletal disorder that causes bones to thicken. This condition can also affect joints, soft tissue, and skin. Melorheostosis can cause pain, stiffness, limited movement, and limb deformities, although some individuals do not have any symptoms. Mutations in the LEMD3 gene have been found to cause melorheostosis. Treatment options include surgery, physical and occupational therapy, hydrotherapy, and medications.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Melorheostosis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Melorheostosis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Melorheostosis" returned 18 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Melorheostosis: a rare entity: a case report.
 

Author(s): Abdelhakim Kherfani, Hachem Mahjoub

Journal:

 

Melorheostosis is a rare entity belonging to the group of sclerotic bone dysplasias. Described for the first time in 1922 by Leri, it remains imperfectly known as clinical presentations are highly variable, and the etiological diagnosis is not fully elucidated. We report a case of ...

Last Updated: 9 Dec 2014

Go To URL
Melorheostosis of the hand affecting the c6 sclerotome and presenting with carpal tunnel syndrome.
 

Author(s): Shalimar Abdullah, Noreen Fazlina Mat Nor, Nor Hazla Mohamed Haflah

Journal: Singapore Med J. 2014 Apr;55(4):e54-6.

 

Melorheostosis is a rare, progressive bone disease accompanied by hyperostosis and soft tissue fibrosis. While affected adults present with contracture and pain, children present with limb length discrepancy and deformity. We report the case of a 20-year-old woman with melorheostosis ...

Last Updated: 25 Apr 2014

Go To URL
Successful treatment of pain in melorheostosis with zoledronate, with improvement on bone scintigraphy.
 

Author(s): Samy Slimani, Adlen Nezzar, Hachemi Makhloufi

Journal:

 

Melorheostosis is a very rare sclerosing bone disorder that involves frequently one limb. It may be asymptomatic, but pain and limb deformity may occur and can be very debilitating. Different reports have indicated efficacy of bisphosphonates (pamidronate and etidronate) on symptoms. ...

Last Updated: 1 Jul 2013

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Melorheostosis" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Natural History, Pathogenesis and Outcome of Melorheostosis A Rare Osteosclerotic Disease
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Rheumatic Disease

 

Last Updated: 21 Aug 2015

Go to URL