Locked-in syndrome

Common Name(s)

Locked-in syndrome

Locked-in syndrome is a rare neurological disorder. Signs and symptoms include paralysis of voluntary muscles in the body, except for those that control eye movement.Individuals with locked-in syndrome are conscious and can think and reason, but are unable to speak or move.  It may be caused by brain stem stroke, traumatic brain injury, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases that destroy the myelin sheath surrounding nerve cells, or medication overdose.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Locked-in syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Locked-in syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Locked-in syndrome" returned 45 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Fluctuating locked-in syndrome as a presentation of a bilateral pontine infarction.
 

Author(s): Carlos García-Esperón, Elena López-Cancio, Lorena Martín-Aguilar, Mónica Millán, Carlos Castaño, Josep Munuera, Antoni Dávalos

Journal: Neuroradiol J. 2016 Oct;29(5):347-9.

 

The "pontine warning syndrome" is characterized by recurrent episodes of motor hemiparesis, dysarthria and horizontal gaze palsy associated with basilar artery branch infarction. We report a case of a patient who presented with recurrent, self-limited episodes of locked-in syndrome, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
Evaluation of the visual function of patients with locked-in syndrome: Report of 13 cases.
 

Author(s): M Graber, G Challe, M F Alexandre, B Bodaghi, P LeHoang, V Touitou

Journal: J Fr Ophtalmol. 2016 May;39(5):437-40.

 

Although visual function is thought to be preserved in patients with locked-in syndrome (LIS), enabling them to communicate through vertical or lateral eye movements or blinking of the upper eyelid, nothing is known about the actual visual function of patients with LIS. The goal of ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
A Case Report of Locked-in Syndrome Due to Bilateral Vertebral Artery Dissection After Cervical Spine Manipulation Treated by Arterial Embolectomy.
 

Author(s): Jiang-Qiong Ke, Bo Yin, Fang-Wang Fu, Sheng-Min Shao, Yan Lin, Qi-Qiang Dong, Xiao-Tong Wang, Guo-Qing Zheng

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Feb;95(5):e2693.

 

Cervical spine manipulation (CSM) is a commonly spinal manipulative therapies for the relief of cervical spine-related conditions worldwide, but its use remains controversial. CSM may carry the potential for serious neurovascular complications, primarily due to vertebral artery dissection ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Locked-in syndrome" returned 4 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Life can be worth living in locked-in syndrome.
 

Author(s): D Lulé, C Zickler, S Häcker, M A Bruno, A Demertzi, F Pellas, S Laureys, A Kübler

Journal: Prog. Brain Res.. 2009 ;177():339-51.

 

The locked-in syndrome (LIS) describes patients who are awake and conscious but severely deefferented leaving the patient in a state of almost complete immobility and loss of verbal communication. The etiology ranges from acute (e.g., brainstem stroke, which is the most frequent cause ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
The patient's journey: living with locked-in syndrome.
 

Author(s): Nick Chisholm, Grant Gillett

Journal: BMJ. 2005 Jul;331(7508):94-7.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
Locked-in syndrome.
 

Author(s): Eimear Smith, Mark Delargy

Journal: BMJ. 2005 Feb;330(7488):406-9.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Feasibility of mindBEAGLE in Disorders of Consciousness or Locked-In Syndrome
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Consciousness Disorders; Locked-In Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 11 May 2016

Go to URL
Brain Computer Interface Complete locked-in State Communication
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Complete Locked-in State

 

Last Updated: 29 Nov 2016

Go to URL
First Study With a Brain Implant to Help Locked-in Patients Communicate at Home
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Locked-In Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 8 Nov 2016

Go to URL