Levator syndrome

Common Name(s)

Levator syndrome

Levator syndrome is characterized by sporadic pain in the rectum caused by spasm of a muscle near the anus (the levator ani muscle). The muscle spasm causes pain that typically is not related to defecation. The pain usually lasts less than 20 minutes. Pain may be brief and intense or a vague ache high in the rectum. It may occur spontaneously or with sitting and can waken a person from sleep. The pain may feel as if it would be relieved by the passage of gas or a bowel movement. In severe cases, the pain can persist for many hours and can recur frequently. A person may have undergone various unsuccessful rectal operations to relieve these symptoms.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Levator syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Levator syndrome" returned 5 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Evaluation of the levator veli palatini muscle thickness in patients with velocardiofacial syndrome using magnetic resonance imaging.
 

Author(s): Mikyong Park, Seung Hyun Ahn, Jae Hoon Jeong, Rong-Min Baek

Journal: J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2015 Aug;68(8):1100-5.

 

Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is associated with velopharyngeal insufficiency, which occurs in approximately 75% of VCFS patients. Surgical management of velopharyngeal insufficiency in VCFS patients is difficult with a high revision rate due to the anatomic and physiological abnormalities ...

Last Updated: 10 Aug 2015

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Biofeedback is superior to electrogalvanic stimulation and massage for treatment of levator ani syndrome.
 

Author(s): Giuseppe Chiarioni, Adriana Nardo, Italo Vantini, Antonella Romito, William E Whitehead

Journal: Gastroenterology. 2010 Apr;138(4):1321-9.

 

Levator ani syndrome (LAS) might be treated using biofeedback to teach pelvic floor relaxation, electrogalvanic stimulation (EGS), or massage of levator muscles. We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of these techniques and assess physiologic ...

Last Updated: 29 Mar 2010

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Clinical trial: effects of botulinum toxin on Levator ani syndrome--a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.
 

Author(s): S S C Rao, J Paulson, M Mata, B Zimmerman

Journal: Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther.. 2009 May;29(9):985-91.

 

Levator ani syndrome is characterized by anorectal discomfort/pain, treatment of which is unsatisfactory. We hypothesized that Botulinum toxin relieves spasm and improves symptoms.

Last Updated: 21 Apr 2009

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Levator syndrome" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Levator ani syndrome - a case study and literature review.
 

Author(s): Ching Luen Ng

Journal: Aust Fam Physician. 2007 Jun;36(6):449-52.

 

Although anorectal symptoms are a common problem seen in general practice, general practitioners may sometimes encounter patients presenting with anorectal pain without a detectable cause.

Last Updated: 13 Jun 2007

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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