Kuru

Common Name(s)

Kuru, Kuru, susceptibility to

Kuru, a fatal neurodegenerative condition, is a human prion disease that primarily affected the Fore linguistic group of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Kuru was transmitted by the practice of consuming dead relatives as a mark of respect and mourning ('transumption'). The incidence has fallen dramatically since the cessation of cannibalism in the 1950s (summary by {16:Wadsworth et al., 2008}).
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Kuru" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Kuru" returned 58 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Epidemiological mechanisms of genetic resistance to kuru.
 

Author(s): Katherine E Atkins, Jeffrey P Townsend, Jan Medlock, Alison P Galvani

Journal:

 

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), such as kuru, are invariably fatal neurodegenerative conditions caused by a malformation of the prion protein. Heterozygosity of codon 129 of the prion protein gene has been associated with increased host resistance to TSEs, although ...

Last Updated: 6 Jun 2013

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Replication and spread of CJD, kuru and scrapie agents in vivo and in cell culture.
 

Author(s): Kohtaro Miyazawa, Kaitlin Emmerling, Laura Manuelidis

Journal: Virulence. ;2(3):188-99.

 

Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) agents are defined by their virulence for particular species, their spread in the population, their incubation time to cause disease, and their neuropathological sequelae. Murine adapted human agents, including sporadic CJD (sCJD), New ...

Last Updated: 30 Jun 2011

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Kuru" returned 9 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Review. Understanding kuru: the contribution of anthropology and medicine.
 

Author(s): Shirley Lindenbaum

Journal: Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.. 2008 Nov;363(1510):3715-20.

 

To understand kuru and solve the problems of its cause and transmission required the integration of knowledge from both anthropological and medical research. Anthropological studies elucidated the origin and spread of kuru, the local mortuary practices of endocannibalism, the social ...

Last Updated: 13 Oct 2008

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Review. The epidemiology of kuru: monitoring the epidemic from its peak to its end.
 

Author(s): Michael P Alpers

Journal: Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.. 2008 Nov;363(1510):3707-13.

 

Kuru is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy restricted to the Fore people and their neighbours in a remote region of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. When first investigated in 1957 it was found to be present in epidemic proportions, with approximately 1000 deaths ...

Last Updated: 13 Oct 2008

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Review. Kuru and its contribution to medicine.
 

Author(s): D Carleton Gajdusek

Journal: Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.. 2008 Nov;363(1510):3697-700.

 

The solution of kuru led us to the solution of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and to the elucidation, in humans and other species, of previously unknown mechanisms of infection. These require very close three-dimensional matching, which determines infectious nucleant or prion activity. ...

Last Updated: 13 Oct 2008

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