Juvenile dermatomyositis

Common Name(s)

Juvenile dermatomyositis

Juvenile dermatomyositis has some similarities to adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis. It typically affects children ages 2 to 15 years, with symptoms that include weakness of the muscles close to the trunk of the body, inflammation, edema, muscle pain, fatigue, skin rashes, abdominal pain, fever, and contractures. Children with juvenile dermatomyositis may have difficulty swallowing and breathing, and the heart may also be affected.  About 20 to 30 percent of children with juvenile dermatomyositis develop calcium deposits in the soft tissue. Affected children may not show higher than normal levels of the muscle enzyme creatine kinase in their blood but have higher than normal levels of other muscle enzymes.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Juvenile dermatomyositis" for support, advocacy or research.

Isabella's Aviary Alliance, LLC

Isabella’s Aviary Alliance, LLC actively demonstrates, through Isabella’s passionate and loving care in breeding and raising baby parrots for other special needs children, the possibility for two hearts—bird and child—coming together and connecting in a way which infinitely brightens the lives of both.

Last Updated: 2 Aug 2013

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The Myositis Association

The mission of the Myositis Association is to: - Provide support to myositis patients and their families - Provide connections between the Medical Advisory Board and the general medical and patient communities - Increase funding to support myositis research

Last Updated: 14 Jan 2013

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Juvenile dermatomyositis" for support, advocacy or research.

Isabella's Aviary Alliance, LLC

Isabella’s Aviary Alliance, LLC actively demonstrates, through Isabella’s passionate and loving care in breeding and raising baby parrots for other special needs children, the possibility for two hearts—bird and child—coming together and connecting in a way which infinitely brightens the lives of both.

http://www.isabellasaviary.com

Last Updated: 2 Aug 2013

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The Myositis Association

The mission of the Myositis Association is to: - Provide support to myositis patients and their families - Provide connections between the Medical Advisory Board and the general medical and patient communities - Increase funding to support myositis research

http://www.myositis.org

Last Updated: 14 Jan 2013

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Juvenile dermatomyositis" returned 123 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Increased presence of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in inflamed muscle of patients with active juvenile dermatomyositis compared to peripheral blood.
 

Author(s): Yvonne Vercoulen, Felicitas Bellutti Enders, Jenny Meerding, Maud Plantinga, Elisabeth F Elst, Hemlata Varsani, Christa van Schieveen, Mette H Bakker, Mark Klein, Rianne C Scholman, Wim Spliet, Valeria Ricotti, Hans J P M Koenen, Roel A de Weger, Lucy R Wedderburn, Annet van Royen-Kerkhof, Berent J Prakken

Journal:

 

Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting the microvasculature of skin and muscle. CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulators of immune homeostasis. A role for Tregs in JDM pathogenesis has not yet been established. Here, ...

Last Updated: 27 Aug 2014

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Anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis identify a distinct clinical phenotype: a prospective cohort study.
 

Author(s): Sarah L Tansley, Zoe E Betteridge, Harsha Gunawardena, Thomas S Jacques, Catherine M Owens, Clarissa Pilkington, Katie Arnold, Shireena Yasin, Elena Moraitis, Lucy R Wedderburn, Neil J McHugh,

Journal:

 

The aim of this study was to define the frequency and associated clinical phenotype of anti-MDA5 autoantibodies in a large UK based, predominantly Caucasian, cohort of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM).

Last Updated: 29 Aug 2014

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Calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis is influenced by both anti-NXP2 autoantibody status and age at disease onset.
 

Author(s): Sarah L Tansley, Zoe E Betteridge, Gavin Shaddick, Harsha Gunawardena, Katie Arnold, Lucy R Wedderburn, Neil J McHugh,

Journal: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2014 Dec;53(12):2204-8.

 

Calcinosis is a major cause of morbidity in JDM and has previously been linked to anti-NXP2 autoantibodies, younger age at disease onset and more persistent disease activity. This study aimed to investigate the clinical associations of anti-NXP2 autoantibodies in patients with JDM ...

Last Updated: 24 Nov 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Juvenile dermatomyositis" returned 10 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Adult and juvenile dermatomyositis: are the distinct clinical features explained by our current understanding of serological subgroups and pathogenic mechanisms?
 

Author(s): Sarah L Tansley, Neil J McHugh, Lucy R Wedderburn

Journal:

 

Adult and juvenile dermatomyositis share the hallmark features of pathognomic skin rash and muscle inflammation, but are heterogeneous disorders with a range of additional disease features and complications. The frequency of important clinical features such as calcinosis, interstitial ...

Last Updated: 1 Aug 2014

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Type I interferon pathway in adult and juvenile dermatomyositis.
 

Author(s): Emily C Baechler, Hatice Bilgic, Ann M Reed

Journal: Arthritis Res. Ther.. 2011 ;13(6):249.

 

Gene expression profiling and protein studies of the type I interferon pathway have revealed important insights into the disease process in adult and juvenile dermatomyositis. The most prominent and consistent feature has been a characteristic whole blood gene signature indicating ...

Last Updated: 28 Mar 2012

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in Genetics Home Reference.

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Five-year Actively Controlled Clinical Trial in New Onset Juvenile Dermatomyositis
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Juvenile Dermatomyositis

 

Last Updated: 16 Feb 2011

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Creatine Supplementation in Pediatric Rheumatology
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Juvenile Dermatomyositis

 

Last Updated: 12 Jan 2012

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Efficacy of Micro-Pulse Steroid Therapy as Induction Therapy in Patients With Polymyalgia Rheumatica
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Polymyalgia Rheumatica

 

Last Updated: 18 Jul 2010

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