Iron deficiency anemia

Common Name(s)

Iron deficiency anemia

Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia. Anemia occurs when there are not enough healthy red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen to the body’s tissues. Iron deficiency anemia is caused by our body not having enough iron. We get iron from our food, and also reuse (recycle) the iron from old red blood cells when they are taken from out of our system by the spleen. Iron is part of hemoglobin which is the molecule inside red blood cells which carries oxygen.

Symptoms may include extreme tiredness (fatigue), pale skin, weakness, shortness of breath, chest pain, frequent infections, headache, dizziness, cold hands and feet, soreness of your tongue, brittle nails, fast heartbeat, unusual craving for non-nutritive substances, such as ice or dirt, poor appetite, and uncomfortable tingling in your legs. Causes may include blood loss, a lack of iron in your diet, pregnancy, or an inability to absorb iron. Conditions which may make it difficult to absorb iron include Celiac disease and Crohn’s disease. Gastric bypass surgery or taking too many calcium based antacids may also decrease iron absorption.

Some individuals are at higher risk of developing iron deficiency anemia including women, infants and children, and frequent blood donors. Mild iron deficiency anemia doesn’t usually have complication. Severe iron deficiency anemia may lead to health problem including heart problems, problems during pregnancy, and growth problems. To diagnose iron deficiency anemia, your doctor will run blood work to determine your red blood cell size and color, hematocrit (the percentage of your blood volume made up of red blood cells), hemoglobin, and ferritin (protein that helps store iron in your body). Your doctor may recommend iron supplement to treat iron deficiency anemia. If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Iron deficiency anemia" for support, advocacy or research.

Center for Jewish Genetics

The Center is dedicated to gathering and disseminating knowledge about Jewish genetic disorders and hereditary cancers. Its mission is to educate and serve health care professionals, clergy and the Jewish community.

Last Updated: 26 Dec 2012

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Iron deficiency anemia" for support, advocacy or research.

Center for Jewish Genetics

The Center is dedicated to gathering and disseminating knowledge about Jewish genetic disorders and hereditary cancers. Its mission is to educate and serve health care professionals, clergy and the Jewish community.

http://www.jewishgenetics.org

Last Updated: 26 Dec 2012

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Iron deficiency anemia" returned 349 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Risk factors for iron deficiency anemia in infants aged 6 to 12 months and its effects on neuropsychological development].
 

Author(s): Kang Xu, Cui-Mei Zhang, Lian-Hong Huang, Si-Mao Fu, Yu-Ling Liu, Ang Chen, Jun-Bin Ou

Journal: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2015 Aug;17(8):830-6.

 

To study the risk factors for moderate and severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infants aged 6-12 months, and to preliminarily investigate the effects of IDA on the neuromotor development and temperament characteristics of infants.

Last Updated: 20 Aug 2015

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Iron-Deficiency Anemia.
 

Author(s): Clara Camaschella

Journal: N. Engl. J. Med.. 2015 Jul;373(5):485-6.

 

Last Updated: 30 Jul 2015

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Association between the presence of iron deficiency anemia and hemoglobin A1c in Korean adults: the 2011-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
 

Author(s): Jae W Hong, Cheol R Ku, Jung H Noh, Kyung S Ko, Byoung D Rhee, Dong-Jun Kim

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2015 May;94(20):e825.

 

Few studies have investigated the clinical effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on the use of the Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a screening parameter for diabetes or prediabetes. We investigated the association between IDA and HbA1c levels in Korean adults.Among the 11,472 adults (≥19 ...

Last Updated: 22 May 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Iron deficiency anemia" returned 33 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review.
 

Author(s): Ole Haagen Nielsen, Mark Ainsworth, Mehmet Coskun, Günter Weiss

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2015 Jun;94(23):e963.

 

Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement ...

Last Updated: 11 Jun 2015

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The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child's health.
 

Author(s): Noran M Abu-Ouf, Mohammed M Jan

Journal: Saudi Med J. 2015 Feb;36(2):146-9.

 

Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining ...

Last Updated: 27 Feb 2015

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Role of small bowel capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia in elderly: a comprehensive review of the current literature.
 

Author(s): Adnan Muhammad, Gitanjali Vidyarthi, Patrick Brady

Journal: World J. Gastroenterol.. 2014 Jul;20(26):8416-23.

 

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common and often under recognized problem in the elderly. It may be the result of multiple factors including a bleeding lesion in the gastrointestinal tract. Twenty percent of elderly patients with IDA have a negative upper and lower endoscopy and two-thirds ...

Last Updated: 15 Jul 2014

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Time to Relapse of Iron Deficiency Anaemia After Standard Treatment With The Intravenous Iron (Monofer®)
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Iron Deficiency Anaemia

 

Last Updated: 8 Sep 2015

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Last Updated: 17 Jul 2013

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The Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Pregnancy
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Iron Deficiency Anemia

 

Last Updated: 27 Oct 2015

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