Hypermobility

Common Name(s)

Hypermobility

Hypermobility is a condition in which joints can easily move beyond the normal range for that particular joint. It is most common in women and children but can be seen in both genders and all ages. It is most commonly seen in the elbows, wrist, fingers, and knees. Ligaments are thick bands of tissue that help keep the joints from moving too much, but in people with hypermobile joints, this band is loose or weak. Individuals with hypermobile joints are sometimes called "double jointed". Hypermobility can cause pain in the joints, as well as arthritis. These joints may also sprain or dislocate more easily. Extra care may be needed to protect an affected person's joints. Hypermobility tends to run in families suggesting a genetic basis. This condition is diagnosed by a physical examination of the affected joints, and often requires no treatment. If treatment is needed, it will depend on the patient’s specific case. When there are no other symptoms or medical problems in a person with hypermobile joints, it is called benign hypermobility. Hypermobility however is a common feature of some rare genetic disorders. If you or someone you knows has hypermobility along with other health concerns a doctor should be consulted. (see also: Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome as well as other conditions associated with hypermobility).

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hypermobility" for support, advocacy or research.

Ehlers-Danlos Support UK

EDS UK was set up in 1987 to support, advise and inform those living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. We aim to help them live a full, active and positive life. Over 25 years later, we remain the only UK based charity that exclusively represents and supports people with all types of EDS. We run regular events and conferences to bring our community together, and produce literature and merchandise to increase understanding and improve management of the condition. We have over 30 support groups around the country to provide our members with a local peer support network and we hope to expand this

Last Updated: 17 Aug 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hypermobility" for support, advocacy or research.

Ehlers-Danlos Support UK

EDS UK was set up in 1987 to support, advise and inform those living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. We aim to help them live a full, active and positive life. Over 25 years later, we remain the only UK based charity that exclusively represents and supports people with all types of EDS. We run regular events and conferences to bring our community together, and produce literature and merchandise to increase understanding and improve management of the condition. We have over 30 support groups around the country to provide our members with a local peer support network and we hope to expand this

http://www.ehlers-danlos.org

Last Updated: 17 Aug 2015

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Hypermobility" returned 116 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The extent and risk of knee injuries in children aged 9-14 with Generalised Joint Hypermobility and knee joint hypermobility - the CHAMPS-study Denmark.
 

Author(s): Tina Junge, Lisbeth Runge Larsen, Birgit Juul-Kristensen, Niels Wedderkopp

Journal:

 

Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is suggested as an aetiological factor for knee injuries in adolescents and adults. It is presumed that GJH causes decreased joint stability, thereby increasing the risk of knee injuries during challenging situations like jumping and landing. ...

Last Updated: 13 Jun 2015

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Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15 year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark.
 

Author(s): Tina Junge, Niels Wedderkopp, Jonas Bloch Thorlund, Karen Søgaard, Birgit Juul-Kristensen

Journal: J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2015 Jun;25(3):501-7.

 

Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the ...

Last Updated: 13 May 2015

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Association between joint hypermobility, scoliosis, and cranial base anomalies in paediatric Osteogenesis imperfecta patients: a retrospective cross-sectional study.
 

Author(s): Heidi Arponen, Outi Mäkitie, Janna Waltimo-Sirén

Journal:

 

Joint hypermobility is a common clinical characteristic of patients with Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a disorder with serious comorbidities of scoliosis and cranial base anomalies. This study aimed at evaluating how prevalent joint hypermobility is in paediatric OI patients, and ...

Last Updated: 5 Jan 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Hypermobility" returned 17 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The relationship between benign joint hypermobility syndrome and psychological distress: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
 

Author(s): Toby O Smith, Victoria Easton, Holly Bacon, Emma Jerman, Kate Armon, Fiona Poland, Alex J Macgregor

Journal: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2014 Jan;53(1):114-22.

 

This study examines the reported evidence of an association between benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) and psychological symptoms.

Last Updated: 16 Dec 2013

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Hallux valgus and hypermobility of the first ray: facts and fiction.
 

Author(s): Jesse F Doty, Michael J Coughlin

Journal: Int Orthop. 2013 Sep;37(9):1655-60.

 

The aetiology of hallux valgus with regard to stability of the first metatarsocuneiform joint has historically been subject to much debate. Associations between the magnitude of the intermetatarsal angle and the hallux valgus angle have previously been established. Metatarsocuneiform ...

Last Updated: 6 Sep 2013

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Joint hypermobility, obstetrical outcomes, and pelvic floor disorders.
 

Author(s): Leise R Knoepp, Kelly C McDermott, Alvaro Muñoz, Joan L Blomquist, Victoria L Handa

Journal: Int Urogynecol J. 2013 May;24(5):735-40.

 

Benign joint hypermobility syndrome may be a risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. It is unknown whether hypermobility impacts the progress of childbirth, a known risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Our objective was to investigate the association between joint hypermobility ...

Last Updated: 7 May 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Wearing a Compression Garment for Patients With Hypermobility Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

 

Last Updated: 8 Jul 2014

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Evaluating Physiological Markers of Emotional Trauma: A Randomized Controlled Comparison of Mind-Body Therapies
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Hypermobility, Joint; Depression; Anxiety

 

Last Updated: 24 Dec 2015

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Comparing Voiding Trials After Midurethral Sling for Stress Incontinence
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Stress Urinary Incontinence; Urethral Hypermobility; Cystocele

 

Last Updated: 30 Sep 2015

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