High cholesterol

Common Name(s)

High cholesterol, Hypercholesterolemia

High cholesterol, or hypercholesterolemia, is a condition in which there are high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Cholesterol is a thick, fat-like substance made by our body, mainly in the liver. We also get cholesterol from some of the foods we eat, such as egg yolks, meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. Our bodies needs cholesterol, but too much may cause health problems. Too much cholesterol may stick to the sides of arteries (the blood vessels which carry oxygen rich blood to every part of our body). As more cholesterol builds up, a mass of cholesterol and other substances that circulate in our blood form plaques or clumps on the wall of the artery. As the plaque builds, the arteries become narrow and stiff (also known as atherosclerosis). Decreased flow of oxygen to the heart may cause angina (chest pain) or a heart attack. Decreased oxygen flow to the legs may cause leg pain or peripheral artery disease. Sometimes a plaque ruptures, and the blood clot that forms to stop the bleeding blocks the artery completely leading to a heart attack or stroke, depending on the artery affected.

There are often no symptoms in the early stages of high cholesterol. The best way to find out if you have high cholesterol is to have a lipid panel/lipid profile blood test. Risk factors associated with high cholesterol include: family history of high cholesterol or heart disease, smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, poor diet, and lack of exercise. Certain types of high cholesterol may run in families. Treatment to lower cholesterol levels may include exercise, eating food low in cholesterol, and medication. Sometimes surgery may be needed. Early diagnosis and treatment have been shown to improve the health of individuals affected by high cholesterol. Talk with your doctor about the latest treatments to decide which options are the best for you.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "High cholesterol" for support, advocacy or research.

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "High cholesterol" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "High cholesterol" returned 866 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Association of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene polymorphism, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis using a Mendelian randomization approach.
 

Author(s): Zhijun Wu, Yuqing Lou, Xiaochun Qiu, Yan Liu, Lin Lu, Qiujing Chen, Wei Jin

Journal:

 

Recent randomized controlled trials have challenged the concept that increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk reduction. The causal role of HDL-C in the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. To increase ...

Last Updated: 4 Nov 2014

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Possible association of ABCB1:c.3435T>C polymorphism with high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol response to statin treatment--a pilot study.
 

Author(s): Anna Sałacka, Agnieszka Bińczak-Kuleta, Mariusz Kaczmarczyk, Iwona Hornowska, Krzysztof Safranow, Jeremy S C Clark

Journal:

 

The gene product ABCB1 (formerly MDR1 or P-glycoprotein) is hypothesized to be involved in cholesterol cellular trafficking, redistribution and intestinal re-absorption. Carriers of the ABCB1:3435T allele have previously been associated with decreases in ABCB1 mRNA and protein concentrations ...

Last Updated: 31 Aug 2014

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Association between dispensing channel and medication adherence among medicare beneficiaries taking medications to treat diabetes, high blood pressure, or high blood cholesterol.
 

Author(s): Reethi N Iyengar, Dhanur S Balagere, Rochelle R Henderson, Abbey L LeFrancois, Rebecca M Rabbitt, Sharon Glave Frazee

Journal: J Manag Care Spec Pharm. 2014 Aug;20(8):851-61.

 

Medication adherence, defined as taking medications as prescribed, is a key component in controlling disease progression and managing chronic illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, and high blood cholesterol. These diseases constitute 3 of the top 5 most prevalent conditions among ...

Last Updated: 26 Jul 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "High cholesterol" returned 48 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Genes associated with low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.
 

Author(s): Alireza Ahmadzadeh, Fereidoun Azizi

Journal: Arch Iran Med. 2014 Jun;17(6):444-50.

 

Atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in the world through causing ischemic heart disease (IHD). Altered serum lipid level is the most important risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). Many studies reveal a strong inverse association between low levels of high density ...

Last Updated: 11 Jun 2014

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Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions.
 

Author(s): Bishnu H Subedi, Parag H Joshi, Steven R Jones, Seth S Martin, Michael J Blaha, Erin D Michos

Journal:

 

Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, ...

Last Updated: 21 Apr 2014

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Very high fructose intake increases serum LDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol: a meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials.
 

Author(s): Yu Hui Zhang, Tao An, Rong Cheng Zhang, Qiong Zhou, Yan Huang, Jian Zhang

Journal: J. Nutr.. 2013 Sep;143(9):1391-8.

 

Fructose is widely used as a sweetener in the production of many foods, yet the relation between fructose intake and cholesterol remains uncertain. In this study, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of human, controlled, feeding trials involving isocaloric fructose ...

Last Updated: 21 Aug 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Familial Hypercholesterolemia Canada / Hypercholesterolemie Familiale Canada
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Familial Hypercholesterolemia; Lipid Disorder

 

Last Updated: 20 Jun 2014

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Study of Awareness and Detection of Familial Hypercholesterolemia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Hypercholesterolemia

 

Last Updated: 18 Dec 2014

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French Observatory of Familial Hypercholesterolemia in Cardiology
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Familial Hypercholesterolemia

 

Last Updated: 12 Feb 2015

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