Hereditary angioedema

Common Name(s)

Hereditary angioedema, HAE

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, debilitating, and potentially fatal genetic disorder that is characterized by episodes of swelling in various body parts including the hands, feet, face and airway. In addition, patients often have bouts of excruciating abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting that is caused by swelling in the intestinal wall. Airway swelling is particularly dangerous and can lead to death by asphyxiation.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hereditary angioedema" for support, advocacy or research.

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US Hereditary Angioedema Association

Helping HAE patients and their families to achieve lifelong health.

Last Updated: 5 Mar 2013

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hereditary angioedema" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
US Hereditary Angioedema Association

Helping HAE patients and their families to achieve lifelong health.

http://www.haea.org

Last Updated: 5 Mar 2013

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

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General Resources

HAE Essentials - A Patient's Guide

Video series of HAE disease information for patients and family and caregivers

Updated 20 Nov 2012

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Hereditary angioedema" returned 95 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Hereditary angioedema and autoimmunity.
 

Author(s): Paola Triggianese, Maria D Guarino, Eleonora Ballanti, Maria S Chimenti, Roberto Perricone

Journal: Isr. Med. Assoc. J.. 2014 Oct;16(10):622-4.

 

Last Updated: 2 Dec 2014

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Clinical and laboratory characteristics that differentiate hereditary angioedema in 72 patients with angioedema.
 

Author(s): Isao Ohsawa, Daisuke Honda, Seiji Nagamachi, Atsuko Hisada, Mamiko Shimamoto, Hiroyuki Inoshita, Satoshi Mano, Yasuhiko Tomino

Journal: Allergol Int. 2014 Dec;63(4):595-602.

 

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but life-threatening condition that results from mutations in C1-inhibitor (C1-INH). Since distinguishing HAE from other causes of angioedema (AE) is a critical problem in emergencies, the objective of the present study was to clarify the differences ...

Last Updated: 26 Nov 2014

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Bradykinin-mediated hereditary angioedema (non-estrogen-dependent) without C1 inhibitor deficiency.
 

Author(s): C Vela Vizcaino, L Sola Enrique, S Chugo Gordillo, M T Lizaso Bacaicoa, T Caballero Molina, B E García Figueroa

Journal: J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol. 2014 ;24(4):280-1.

 

Last Updated: 15 Sep 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Hereditary angioedema" returned 18 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Pasteurized and nanofiltered, plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate for the treatment of hereditary angioedema.
 

Author(s): Konrad Bork

Journal: Immunotherapy. 2014 ;6(5):533-51.

 

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a relatively rare autosomal dominant disorder that is typically characterized by recurrent episodes of edema in various body locations. It is most commonly caused by an inherited deficiency of functionally active C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). Replacement ...

Last Updated: 6 Jun 2014

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Pediatric hereditary angioedema.
 

Author(s): Andrew J MacGinnitie

Journal: Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2014 Aug;25(5):420-7.

 

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a lifelong illness characterized by recurrent swelling of the skin, intestinal tract, and, ominously, the upper airway. It is caused by inadequate activity of the protein C1-inhibitor, with dysfunction in the kallikrein/bradykinin pathway underlying ...

Last Updated: 30 Aug 2014

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[Algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema as a tool for management].
 

Author(s): María Luisa Baeza, Teresa Caballero Molina, Carlos Crespo Diz, González-Quevedo, Mar Guilarte Clavero, Dolores Hernández Fernández de Rojas, Teófilo Lobera Labairu, Carmen Marcos Bravo, Andrés Navarro Ruiz, A Navarro Ruiz, José Luis Poveda Andrés, J L Poveda Andrés, María Antonia Cebollero, A Cebollero de Torre

Journal: Farm Hosp. ;37(6):521-9.

 

Hereditary angioedema is a disease with low prevalence and high heterogeneity with regards to the severity of the clinical picture, which makes the diagnosis difficult and requires the need for early start of specific treatment in order to prevent complications.

Last Updated: 22 Nov 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Study to Assess the Tolerability and Safety of Ecallantide in Children and Adolescents With Hereditary Angioedema
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Hereditary Angioedema Types I and II

 

Last Updated: 23 Sep 2014

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Safety of Ruconest in 2-13 Year Old Hereditary Angioedema (HAE) Patients
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Hereditary Angioedema

 

Last Updated: 28 Jul 2015

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Last Updated: 12 Mar 2015

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