Hemolytic uremic syndrome

Common Name(s)

Hemolytic uremic syndrome

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a complex disorder that may affect children after different infections, particularly bacterial infections that cause bloody diarrhea. HUS causes damage to the blood cells and the kidneys, which are organs in the abdomen responsible for filtering blood and creating urine. Symptoms of HUS commonly include bloody diarrhea, vomiting, pale skin tone, extreme tiredness, fever, blood in the urine, decreased urination, swelling, and confusion. A physician can diagnose HUS using blood, urine, and other lab tests. HUS usually requires treatment in the hospital to manage symptoms and prevent further organ damage.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hemolytic uremic syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Hemolytic uremic syndrome" returned 367 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Hemolytic uremic syndrome with mild renal involvement due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 strain.
 

Author(s): Lucía Pérez, Lucía Apezteguía, Cecilia Piñeyrúa, Agustín Dabezies, María N Bianco, Felipe Schelotto, Gustavo Varela

Journal: Rev. Argent. Microbiol.. ;46(2):103-6.

 

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disorder characterized by the presence of the classic triad: microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal injury. HUS without acute renal failure can be confused with other hematologic diseases. An infantile HUS caused by ...

Last Updated: 11 Jul 2014

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Hemolytic uremic syndrome outbreak in Turkey in 2011 - Reply.
 

Author(s): Zelal Ekinci, Oğuz Söylemezoğlu

Journal: Turk. J. Pediatr.. ;55(6):668.

 

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2014

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Hemolytic uremic syndrome outbreak in Turkey in 2011.
 

Author(s): Sinasi Özsoylu

Journal: Turk. J. Pediatr.. ;55(6):667.

 

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Hemolytic uremic syndrome" returned 46 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.
 

Author(s): David Kavanagh, Tim H Goodship, Anna Richards

Journal: Semin. Nephrol.. 2013 Nov;33(6):508-30.

 

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. The atypical form of HUS is a disease characterized by complement overactivation. Inherited defects in complement genes and acquired autoantibodies against complement ...

Last Updated: 28 Oct 2013

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[Eculizumab for the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: case report and revision of the literature].
 

Author(s): Maria Helena Vaisbich, Luciana Dos Santos Henriques, Andréia Watanabe, Lilian Monteiro Pereira, Camila Cardoso Metran, Denise Avancini Malheiros, Flávia Modanez, João Domingos Montoni da Silva, Simone Vieira, Ana Catarina Lunz Macedo, Bianca Massarope, Erika Arai Furusawa, Benita Galassi Soares Schvartsman

Journal: J Bras Nefrol. ;35(3):237-41.

 

SHU atypical (aHUS), that is, not associated with Escherichia coli Shiga toxinproducing, is seen in 5 to 10% of cases of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), and can occur at any age and may be sporadic or familial. The prognosis in these cases is reserved, with high mortality and morbidity ...

Last Updated: 8 Oct 2013

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Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome: the interplay between complements and the coagulation system.
 

Author(s): Ali Nayer, Arif Asif

Journal: Iran J Kidney Dis. 2013 Sep;7(5):340-5.

 

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare life-threatening disorder characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and impaired renal function. A thrombotic microangiopathy underlies the clinical features of HUS. In the majority of cases, HUS follows an infection ...

Last Updated: 27 Sep 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Atypcial Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome (aHUS) Registry
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 8 Sep 2014

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Complement Activation During Hemodialysis in Atypical Hemolytic Uraemic Syndrome as Underlying Kidney Disease
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Atypical Hemolytic Uraemic Syndrome.

 

Last Updated: 1 Feb 2013

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Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory TTP-HUS
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 18 May 2010

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