Giant Congenital Nevi

Common Name(s)

Giant Congenital Nevi

A congenital giant nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy patch of skin that is present at birth. It is usually smaller in infants and children, but continues to grow with the child. A giant pigmented nevus is usually larger than 20cm in diameter once it stops growing. They are often found on the buttocks, which is known as "bathing trunk" nevi. Skin cancer (such as malignant melanoma and other types) may develop in up to 15% (1 out of 6) of people with larger or giant nevi, often in childhood. The risk is higher for larger or giant congenital nevi located on the back or abdomen.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Giant Congenital Nevi" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Giant Congenital Nevi" returned 7 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Giant congenital melanocytic nevi: selected aspects of diagnostics and treatment.
 

Author(s): Ewa Sawicka, Orest Szczygielski, Klaudia Żak, Paweł Pęczkowski, Elżbieta Michalak, Monika Bekiesińska-Figatowska

Journal:

 

Treatment of giant melanocytic nevi (GMN) remains a multidisciplinary challenge. We present analysis of diagnostics, treatment, and follow- up in children with GMN to establish obligatory procedures in these patients.

Last Updated: 12 Jan 2015

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Hiding in plain sight: molecular genetics applied to giant congenital melanocytic nevi.
 

Author(s): Heather C Etchevers

Journal: J. Invest. Dermatol.. 2014 Apr;134(4):879-82.

 

Large and giant congenital melanocytic nevi are rare malformations that offer surprising insight into prenatal and postnatal acquisition of nevi of any size, central and peripheral nervous system development, and melanomagenesis. In this issue, Charbel et al. demonstrate the use of ...

Last Updated: 20 Mar 2014

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Giant congenital melanocytic nevi in neonates: report of two cases.
 

Author(s): Jen-Chung Chien, Dau-Ming Niu, Mao-Shan Wang, Ming-Tzen Liu, Jiing-Feng Lirng, Shu-Jen Chen, Betau Hwang

Journal: Pediatr Neonatol. 2010 Feb;51(1):61-4.

 

Giant congenital melanocytic nevi are rare, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 20,000 live births. They increase the lifetime risk for malignant melanoma and neurological deficits, including leptomeningeal melanocytosis and epilepsy. Recently, we encountered two patients ...

Last Updated: 15 Mar 2010

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

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The terms "Giant Congenital Nevi" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Phase I Study for Autologous Dermal Substitutes and Dermo-epidermal Skin Substitutes for Treatment of Skin Defects
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Burn Injury; Soft Tissue Injury; Skin Necrosis; Scars; Congenital Giant Nevus; Skin Tumors

 

Last Updated: 22 Feb 2016

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