Gianotti Crosti Syndrome

Common Name(s)

Gianotti Crosti Syndrome

Gianotti-Crosti syndrome, also known as papulovesicular acrodermatitis of childhood, papular acrodermatitis of childhood or acrodermatitis papulosa infantum, is a skin rash caused by a viral infection. The rash develops as dull red spots develops over 3 or 4 days. They appear first on the thighs and buttocks, then on the outer aspects of the arms and finally on the face, often in an asymmetrical pattern. The spots vary in size. Later the rash often looks purple, especially on the legs. The spots may develop fluid-filled blisters. The specific viruses causing Gianotti-Crosti syndrome include: hepatitis B, Epstein Barr, enterovirus, echo and respiratory syncytial virus. A person with Gianotti-Crosti syndrome may also have a low fever and a general feeling of discomfort.

Gianotti-Crosti syndrome mainly affects children between the ages of 6 months and 12 years. A clustering of cases is often observed. Often the child will have an upper respiratory infection before having the rash.

The rash fades in 2-8 weeks with mild scaling. Depending on the virus which caused the rash further treatment may be needed.

Recurrence of the Gianotti-Crosti syndrome is unlikely but has been reported.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Gianotti Crosti Syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Gianotti Crosti Syndrome" returned 14 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Photo quiz. Papular rash in a child after a fever. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.
 

Author(s): Chelsea Tagawa, Mori Speakman

Journal: Am Fam Physician. 2013 Jan;87(1):59-60.

 

Last Updated: 15 Jan 2013

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Acute disseminated erythematous papulovesicular skin lesions in a 7-year-old child: a quiz. Diagnosis: vesicular Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.
 

Author(s): Miriam Linke, Cyrill GĂ©raud, Stefan W Schneider, Sergij Goerdt, Jochen Utikal

Journal: Acta Derm. Venereol.. 2011 Jun;91(4):491-4.

 

Last Updated: 20 Jun 2011

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Question: Can you identify this condition? Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.
 

Author(s): Chou-Yueh Wu, Wei-Hsuan Huang

Journal: Can Fam Physician. 2009 Jul;55(7):712, 716.

 

Last Updated: 15 Jul 2009

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Gianotti Crosti Syndrome" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Gianotti-Crosti syndrome following Japanese encephalitis vaccination.
 

Author(s): Nam Gyu Kang, Chee Won Oh

Journal: J. Korean Med. Sci.. 2003 Jun;18(3):459-61.

 

We report a three-year-old Korean boy who presented with itching symmetrical erythematous macules and papules on his face, trunk, and extremities for 1 week. Lymphadenopathies were detected on physical examination. He was vaccinated against Japanese B Encephalitis (JE) 1 day before ...

Last Updated: 16 Jun 2003

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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