Frontotemporal dementia

Common Name(s)

Frontotemporal dementia

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a term that describes a group of neurodegenerative conditions that affect the front and sides of the brain (the areas called the frontal and temporal lobes respectively). The cause of FTD is not fully understood at this time. However, scientists believe that genetics and environmental factors may have an influence. Additionally, many studies have shown unusually high levels of proteins in the nerve cells of individuals with the condition. Ultimately, FTD causes the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain to shrink over time (frontotemporal atrophy).

Symptoms of FTD are often categorized either as behavioral changes or as speech and language difficulties, which reflect the brain areas affected. In certain forms of FTD, motor symptoms may appear as well. Behavioral changes are often seen as a loss of empathy, increasing lack of judgment, and depression. Language problems are seen as an increased difficulty with speaking or understanding language. This disease is most often found in older individuals who are in their 50s or 60s. Sadly, once the process begins, symptoms tend to progressively worsen over time.

Although there is no conclusive test to diagnose FTD, a combination of blood tests, reasoning/memory tests, and various brain scans can aid in diagnosing the condition. With brain imaging scans like MRIs, it is sometimes even possible to see the shrinking of the frontal and temporal lobes. If you or your family member has been diagnosed with FTD, talk with your doctor and specialists about the most current treatment options. Support groups are also a good source of information and help connect you with other individuals and families affected by FTD.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Frontotemporal dementia" for support, advocacy or research.

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Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) is a nationwide non-profit organization whose mission is to promote and fund research into finding the cause and cure for the frontotemporal dementias; to provide information, education, and support to persons diagnosed with frontotemporal dementias (FTD) and their families and caregivers; and to educate physicians and allied health professionals about FTD.

Last Updated: 8 Jul 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Frontotemporal dementia" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) is a nationwide non-profit organization whose mission is to promote and fund research into finding the cause and cure for the frontotemporal dementias; to provide information, education, and support to persons diagnosed with frontotemporal dementias (FTD) and their families and caregivers; and to educate physicians and allied health professionals about FTD.

http://www.theaftd.org

Last Updated: 8 Jul 2015

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Frontotemporal dementia" returned 392 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Loss of TBK1 is a frequent cause of frontotemporal dementia in a Belgian cohort.
 

Author(s): Ilse Gijselinck, Sara Van Mossevelde, Julie van der Zee, Anne Sieben, Stéphanie Philtjens, Bavo Heeman, Sebastiaan Engelborghs, Mathieu Vandenbulcke, Greet De Baets, Veerle Bäumer, Ivy Cuijt, Marleen Van den Broeck, Karin Peeters, Maria Mattheijssens, Frederic Rousseau, Rik Vandenberghe, Peter De Jonghe, Patrick Cras, Peter P De Deyn, Jean-Jacques Martin, Marc Cruts, Christine Van Broeckhoven,

Journal: Neurology. 2015 Dec;85(24):2116-25.

 

To assess the genetic contribution of TBK1, a gene implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and FTD-ALS, in Belgian FTD and ALS patient cohorts containing a significant part of genetically unresolved patients.

Last Updated: 15 Dec 2015

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Frontotemporal dementia-associated N279K tau mutant disrupts subcellular vesicle trafficking and induces cellular stress in iPSC-derived neural stem cells.
 

Author(s): Melissa C Wren, Jing Zhao, Chia-Chen Liu, Melissa E Murray, Yuka Atagi, Mary D Davis, Yuan Fu, Hirotaka J Okano, Kotaro Ogaki, Audrey J Strongosky, Pawel Tacik, Rosa Rademakers, Owen A Ross, Dennis W Dickson, Zbigniew K Wszolek, Takahisa Kanekiyo, Guojun Bu

Journal:

 

Pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPND), a major subtype of frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism related to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), is a progressive and terminal neurodegenerative disease caused by c.837 T > G mutation in the MAPT gene encoding microtubule-associated protein ...

Last Updated: 16 Sep 2015

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A genome-wide screening and SNPs-to-genes approach to identify novel genetic risk factors associated with frontotemporal dementia.
 

Author(s): Raffaele Ferrari, Mario Grassi, Erika Salvi, Barbara Borroni, Fernando Palluzzi, Daniele Pepe, Francesca D'Avila, Alessandro Padovani, Silvana Archetti, Innocenzo Rainero, Elisa Rubino, Lorenzo Pinessi, Luisa Benussi, Giuliano Binetti, Roberta Ghidoni, Daniela Galimberti, Elio Scarpini, Maria Serpente, Giacomina Rossi, Giorgio Giaccone, Fabrizio Tagliavini, Benedetta Nacmias, Irene Piaceri, Silvia Bagnoli, Amalia C Bruni, Raffaele G Maletta, Livia Bernardi, Alfredo Postiglione, Graziella Milan, Massimo Franceschi, Annibale A Puca, Valeria Novelli, Cristina Barlassina, Nicola Glorioso, Paolo Manunta, Andrew Singleton, Daniele Cusi, John Hardy, Parastoo Momeni

Journal: Neurobiol. Aging. 2015 Oct;36(10):2904.e13-26.

 

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most prevalent form of early onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a case-control association study in an Italian FTD cohort (n = 530) followed by the novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-to-genes approach and ...

Last Updated: 8 Sep 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Frontotemporal dementia" returned 71 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.
 

Author(s): Nina Rostgaard, Gunhild Waldemar, Jørgen Erik Nielsen, Anja Hviid Simonsen

Journal: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2015 ;40(1-2):54-62.

 

As dementia is a fast-growing health care problem, it is becoming an increasingly urgent need to provide an early diagnosis in order to offer patients the best medical treatment and care. Validated biomarkers which reflect the pathology and disease progression are essential for diagnosis ...

Last Updated: 3 Jul 2015

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Frontotemporal dementia: a bridge between dementia and neuromuscular disease.
 

Author(s): Adeline S L Ng, Rosa Rademakers, Bruce L Miller

Journal: Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.. 2015 Mar;1338():71-93.

 

The concept that frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a purely cortical dementia has largely been refuted by the recognition of its close association with motor neuron disease, and the identification of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) as a major pathological substrate ...

Last Updated: 17 Mar 2015

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Invited review: Frontotemporal dementia caused by microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) mutations: a chameleon for neuropathology and neuroimaging.
 

Author(s): B Ghetti, A L Oblak, B F Boeve, K A Johnson, B C Dickerson, M Goedert

Journal: Neuropathol. Appl. Neurobiol.. 2015 Feb;41(1):24-46.

 

Hereditary frontotemporal dementia associated with mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) is a protean disorder. Three neuropathologic subtypes can be recognized, based on the presence of inclusions made of tau isoforms with three and four repeats, predominantly ...

Last Updated: 29 Jan 2015

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Impact of Emotional Mimicry and Oxytocin on Frontotemporal Dementia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Frontotemporal Dementia

 

Last Updated: 3 Mar 2016

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Study of Social Behavior and Emotion in Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Controls
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Frontotemporal Dementia; Frontotemporal Degeneration; Alzheimer's Disease; Social Behavior

 

Last Updated: 27 Oct 2011

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Efficacy of Web-Based Social-Cognitive Interventions in Right Hemisphere Stroke and Frontotemporal Dementia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Frontotemporal Dementia; Right Sided Cerebral Hemisphere Cerebrovascular Accident

 

Last Updated: 7 Apr 2016

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