Frontotemporal dementia

Common Name(s)

Frontotemporal dementia

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a term that describes a group of neurodegenerative conditions that affect the front and sides of the brain (the areas called the frontal and temporal lobes respectively). The cause of FTD is not fully understood at this time. However, scientists believe that genetics and environmental factors may have an influence. Additionally, many studies have shown unusually high levels of proteins in the nerve cells of individuals with the condition. Ultimately, FTD causes the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain to shrink over time (frontotemporal atrophy).

Symptoms of FTD are often categorized either as behavioral changes or as speech and language difficulties, which reflect the brain areas affected. In certain forms of FTD, motor symptoms may appear as well. Behavioral changes are often seen as a loss of empathy, increasing lack of judgment, and depression. Language problems are seen as an increased difficulty with speaking or understanding language. This disease is most often found in older individuals who are in their 50s or 60s. Sadly, once the process begins, symptoms tend to progressively worsen over time.

Although there is no conclusive test to diagnose FTD, a combination of blood tests, reasoning/memory tests, and various brain scans can aid in diagnosing the condition. With brain imaging scans like MRIs, it is sometimes even possible to see the shrinking of the frontal and temporal lobes. If you or your family member has been diagnosed with FTD, talk with your doctor and specialists about the most current treatment options. Support groups are also a good source of information and help connect you with other individuals and families affected by FTD.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Frontotemporal dementia" for support, advocacy or research.

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Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) is a nationwide non-profit organization whose mission is to promote and fund research into finding the cause and cure for the frontotemporal dementias; to provide information, education, and support to persons diagnosed with frontotemporal dementias (FTD) and their families and caregivers; and to educate physicians and allied health professionals about FTD.

Last Updated: 8 Jul 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Frontotemporal dementia" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration

The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) is a nationwide non-profit organization whose mission is to promote and fund research into finding the cause and cure for the frontotemporal dementias; to provide information, education, and support to persons diagnosed with frontotemporal dementias (FTD) and their families and caregivers; and to educate physicians and allied health professionals about FTD.

http://www.theaftd.org

Last Updated: 8 Jul 2015

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Frontotemporal dementia" returned 502 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Functional Connectivity Changes in Behavioral, Semantic, and Nonfluent Variants of Frontotemporal Dementia.
 

Author(s): P Reyes, M P Ortega-Merchan, A Rueda, F Uriza, Hernando Santamaria-García, N Rojas-Serrano, J Rodriguez-Santos, M C Velasco-Leon, J D Rodriguez-Parra, D E Mora-Diaz, D Matallana

Journal:

 

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) affects behavior, language, and personality. This study aims to explore functional connectivity changes in three FTD variants: behavioral (bvFTD), semantic (svPPA), and nonfluent variant (nfvPPA). Seventy-six patients diagnosed with FTD by international ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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The behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia phenocopy syndrome is a distinct entity - evidence from a longitudinal study.
 

Author(s): E Devenney, T Swinn, E Mioshi, M Hornberger, K E Dawson, S Mead, J B Rowe, J R Hodges

Journal:

 

This study aimed to i) examine the frequency of C9orf72 expansions in a cohort of patients with the behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) phenocopy syndrome, ii) observe outcomes in a group of phenocopy syndrome with very long term follow-up and iii) compare progression ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Screening for Emotional Expression in Frontotemporal Dementia: A Pilot Study.
 

Author(s): Andrew R Carr, Mark M Ashla, Elvira E Jimenez, Mario F Mendez

Journal:

 

Although emotional blunting is a core feature of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), there are no practical clinical measures of emotional expression for the early diagnosis of bvFTD.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Frontotemporal dementia" returned 95 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Molecular Genetics of Frontotemporal Dementia Elucidated by Models-Defects in Endosomal⁻Lysosomal Pathway.
 

Author(s): Sarah E Vandal, Xiaoyue Zheng, S Tariq Ahmad

Journal:

 

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common senile neurodegenerative disease. FTD is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into several subtypes. A mutation in locus (), which encodes a component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III), ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia an autophagy disease?
 

Author(s): Zhiqiang Deng, Patricia Sheehan, Shi Chen, Zhenyu Yue

Journal:

 

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative disorders that share genetic risk factors and pathological hallmarks. Intriguingly, these shared factors result in a high rate of comorbidity of these diseases in patients. Intracellular protein ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Dysregulated molecular pathways in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia spectrum disorder.
 

Author(s): Fen-Biao Gao, Sandra Almeida, Rodrigo Lopez-Gonzalez

Journal: EMBO J.. 2017 10;36(20):2931-2950.

 

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), the second most common form of dementia in people under 65 years of age, is characterized by progressive atrophy of the frontal and/or temporal lobes. FTD overlaps extensively with the motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), especially ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Intranasal Oxytocin for Frontotemporal Dementia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Frontotemporal Dementia

 

Last Updated: 2 Nov 2018

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Longitudinal Evaluation of Familial Frontotemporal Dementia Subjects
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Familial Frontotemporal Dementia

 

Last Updated: 25 Jan 2018

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Low-Dose Lithium for the Treatment of Behavioral Symptoms in Frontotemporal Dementia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)

 

Last Updated: 18 Apr 2017

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