Factor II Deficiency

Common Name(s)

Factor II Deficiency, Factor II

Factor II deficiency is a blood-clotting disorder that results in excessive or prolonged bleeding after an injury or surgery. Factor II is one of 13 proteins involved in proper formation of blood clots. Blood clots are needed to heal wounds, form scabs, and stop bleeding. When factor I levels are low or absent, the blood does not clot correctly, leading to excessive bleeding. Factor II deficiency runs in families and affect both males and females equally. The main symptom of factor II deficiency is excessive and abnormal bleeding. This may occur after childbirth, surgery, trauma, and with menstruation (periods). Bleeding can also occur in the muscles, joints, the mouth, the gut, or, infrequently, the brain. Easy bruising and nosebleeds are also common. Factor II deficiency can be diagnosed by a physician using blood tests. Treatment for factor II deficiency is largely based on controlling bleeding and treating any underlying conditions that contribute to excessive bleeding. When necessary, excessive bleeding can be stopped with infusions of clotting factors into the blood.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Factor II Deficiency" for support, advocacy or research.

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The Haemophilia Society

To ensure that people affected by bleeding disorders have the freedom to make choices and seize opportunities To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to better understand and manage their condition or situation. To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to participate in decision making and service delivery. To influence policy and improve services to people with bleeding disorders.

Last Updated: 3 Apr 2013

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General Support Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Factor II Deficiency" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
The Haemophilia Society

To ensure that people affected by bleeding disorders have the freedom to make choices and seize opportunities To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to better understand and manage their condition or situation. To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to participate in decision making and service delivery. To influence policy and improve services to people with bleeding disorders.

http://www.haemophilia.org.uk/

Last Updated: 3 Apr 2013

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Factor II Deficiency" returned 9 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMDS) deficiency renders colon cancer cells resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor- and CD95-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting complex II formation.
 

Author(s): Kenta Moriwaki, Shinichiro Shinzaki, Eiji Miyoshi

Journal: J. Biol. Chem.. 2011 Dec;286(50):43123-33.

 

Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through binding to TRAIL receptors, death receptor 4 (DR4), and DR5. TRAIL has potential therapeutic value against cancer because of its selective cytotoxic effects on several transformed cell types. ...

Last Updated: 14 Dec 2011

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A type II mutation (Glu117stop), induction of allele-specific mRNA degradation and factor XI deficiency.
 

Author(s): Giulia Soldà, Rosanna Asselta, Rossella Ghiotto, Maria Luisa Tenchini, Giancarlo Castaman, Stefano Duga

Journal: Haematologica. 2005 Dec;90(12):1716-8.

 

The Glu117stop mutation in the factor XI (FXI) gene is the most common cause of FXI deficiency and might cause the disease either by poor secretion/stability of the truncated protein or by decreased mRNA levels. Platelet- and lymphocyte-derived mRNA from three Glu117stop heterozygotes ...

Last Updated: 6 Dec 2005

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Angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene deficiency attenuates susceptibility to tobacco-specific nitrosamine-induced lung tumorigenesis: involvement of transforming growth factor-beta-dependent cell growth attenuation.
 

Author(s): Tsutomu Kanehira, Tatsuo Tani, Tetsuo Takagi, Yuichirou Nakano, Eric F Howard, Masaaki Tamura

Journal: Cancer Res.. 2005 Sep;65(17):7660-5.

 

To clarify an involvement of angiotensin II signaling in lung neoplasia, we have examined the effect of angiotensin II receptor deficiency on 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced lung tumorigenesis. Male angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2)-null mice with an ...

Last Updated: 5 Sep 2005

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Factor II Deficiency" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 21 Jul 2014

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Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy of an AT-III Concentrate.
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Antithrombin III Deficiency

 

Last Updated: 17 Feb 2014

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