Exostoses

Common Name(s)

Exostoses

Exostoses are abnormal bone growths on the surface of a pre-existing bone caused by having too much calcium in the body. They can cause constant, long-lasting pain ranging from mild to severe, depending on the shape, size, and location of the growth. They normally form on the joints of bones such as the ankle or knee and can grow outward toward the skin. Exostoses are typically noncancerous, but can become cancerous in some instances. Exostoses are usually treated by surgically removing the growth.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Exostoses" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Exostoses" returned 78 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Developmental pattern of the hip in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): Ya-Zhou Wang, Kwang-Won Park, Chang-Seon Oh, Yeong-Seub Ahn, Qing-Lin Kang, Sung-Taek Jung, Hae-Ryong Song

Journal:

 

Coxa valga is a common clinical feature of hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). The current study aimed to determine the unique developmental pattern of the hip in patients with HME and evaluate the factors that influence its progression.

Last Updated: 13 May 2015

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The first Korean patient with Potocki-Shaffer syndrome: a rare cause of multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): Young Bae Sohn, Shin-Young Yim, Eun-Hae Cho, Ok-Hwa Kim

Journal: J. Korean Med. Sci.. 2015 Feb;30(2):214-7.

 

Potocki-Shaffer syndrome (PSS, OMIM #601224) is a rare contiguous gene deletion syndrome caused by haploinsufficiency of genes located on the 11p11.2p12. Affected individuals have a number of characteristic features including multiple exostoses, biparietal foramina, abnormalities ...

Last Updated: 5 Feb 2015

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The type 2 diabetes associated rs7903146 T allele within TCF7L2 is significantly under-represented in Hereditary Multiple Exostoses: insights into pathogenesis.
 

Author(s): Federica Sgariglia, Elena Pedrini, Jonathan P Bradfield, Tricia R Bhatti, Pio D'Adamo, John P Dormans, Aruni T Gunawardena, Hakon Hakonarson, Jacqueline T Hecht, Luca Sangiorgi, Maurizio Pacifici, Motomi Enomoto-Iwamoto, Struan F A Grant

Journal: Bone. 2015 Mar;72():123-7.

 

Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by benign cartilage tumors (exostoses) forming near the growth plates, leading to severe health problems. EXT1 and EXT2 are the two genes known to harbor heterozygous loss-of-function mutations that ...

Last Updated: 5 Jan 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Exostoses" returned 4 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Endoscopic transcanal removal of symptomatic external auditory canal exostoses.
 

Author(s): Elliott D Kozin, Aaron K Remenschneider, Parth V Shah, Edward Reardon, Daniel J Lee

Journal: Am J Otolaryngol. ;36(2):283-6.

 

Exostoses are bony outgrowths of the external auditory canal (EAC) that can lead to cerumen entrapment, recurrent infections, and conductive hearing loss. When surgical removal is indicated, a drill or osteotome may be used via a post-auricular, endaural, or transcanal approach. Studies ...

Last Updated: 16 Feb 2015

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Heparan sulfate in skeletal development, growth, and pathology: the case of hereditary multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): Julianne Huegel, Federica Sgariglia, Motomi Enomoto-Iwamoto, Eiki Koyama, John P Dormans, Maurizio Pacifici

Journal: Dev. Dyn.. 2013 Sep;242(9):1021-32.

 

Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans. Due to their sulfation patterns, the HS chains interact with numerous signaling proteins and regulate their distribution and activity on target cells. Many of these proteins, including ...

Last Updated: 21 Aug 2013

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Glycobiology and the growth plate: current concepts in multiple hereditary exostoses.
 

Author(s): Kevin B Jones

Journal: J Pediatr Orthop. ;31(5):577-86.

 

Multiple hereditary exostoses, also termed as multiple osteochondromas, is a heritable disorder of connective tissue with primarily orthopaedic clinical manifestations. Understanding of its biological underpinnings has been advanced on a variety of fronts in recent years.

Last Updated: 9 Jun 2011

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Autologous Stem Cells in Achilles Tendinopathy
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Achilles Tendinitis, Right Leg; Achilles Tendinitis; Achilles Degeneration; Achilles Tendon Thickening; Tendinopathy; Achilles Tendinitis, Left Leg

 

Last Updated: 13 Feb 2014

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Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Surgical Trial
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Cervical Spondylosis With Myelopathy

 

Last Updated: 20 Nov 2015

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Baxter: Actifuse SHAPE vs DBX in ACC
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Cervical Spine Degenerative Disease Nos; Cervical Spondylosis With Myelopathy

 

Last Updated: 3 Dec 2013

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