Exostoses

Common Name(s)

Exostoses

Exostoses are abnormal bone growths on the surface of a pre-existing bone caused by having too much calcium in the body. They can cause constant, long-lasting pain ranging from mild to severe, depending on the shape, size, and location of the growth. They normally form on the joints of bones such as the ankle or knee and can grow outward toward the skin. Exostoses are typically noncancerous, but can become cancerous in some instances. Exostoses are usually treated by surgically removing the growth.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Exostoses" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Exostoses" returned 67 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

A splice mutation and mRNA decay of EXT2 provoke hereditary multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): Chen Tian, Rengna Yan, Shuzhen Wen, Xueling Li, Tianfeng Li, Zhenming Cai, Xinxiu Li, Hong Du, Huimei Chen

Journal:

 

Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) is an autosomal dominant disease. The classical paradigm of mutation screening seeks to relate alterations in the exostosin glycosyltransferase genes, EXT1 and EXT2, which are responsible for over 70% of HME cases. However, the pathological significance ...

Last Updated: 14 Apr 2014

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Morphological classification for prediction of malignant transformation in multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): X-L Fan, Z-J Han, X-Y Gong, J-J Xiang, L-L Zhu, W-H Chen

Journal: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2014 ;18(6):840-5.

 

To explore the value of morphological classification in predicting malignant transformation in multiple exostoses (ME).

Last Updated: 7 Apr 2014

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[A splicing mutation of EXT1 in a Chinese pedigree with hereditary multiple exostoses].
 

Author(s): Wei Wang, Zheng-Qing Qiu, Hong-Mei Song

Journal: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2014 Feb;16(2):174-80.

 

Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) is an autosomal dominant monogenic disorder of paraplasia ossium. Mutations in EXT1 and EXT2 have been suggested to be responsible for over 70% of HME cases. This study aimed to analyze the clinical features and pathogenic mutations in a Chinese ...

Last Updated: 26 Feb 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Exostoses" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Heparan sulfate in skeletal development, growth, and pathology: the case of hereditary multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): Julianne Huegel, Federica Sgariglia, Motomi Enomoto-Iwamoto, Eiki Koyama, John P Dormans, Maurizio Pacifici

Journal: Dev. Dyn.. 2013 Sep;242(9):1021-32.

 

Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans. Due to their sulfation patterns, the HS chains interact with numerous signaling proteins and regulate their distribution and activity on target cells. Many of these proteins, including ...

Last Updated: 21 Aug 2013

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Glycobiology and the growth plate: current concepts in multiple hereditary exostoses.
 

Author(s): Kevin B Jones

Journal: J Pediatr Orthop. ;31(5):577-86.

 

Multiple hereditary exostoses, also termed as multiple osteochondromas, is a heritable disorder of connective tissue with primarily orthopaedic clinical manifestations. Understanding of its biological underpinnings has been advanced on a variety of fronts in recent years.

Last Updated: 9 Jun 2011

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Acetabular dysplasia associated with hereditary multiple exostoses. A case report.
 

Author(s): N A Felix, J M Mazur, E A Loveless

Journal: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2000 May;82(4):555-7.

 

Hereditary multiple exostoses is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by multiple osteochondromata, most commonly affecting the forearm, knee and ankle. Osteochondromata of the proximal femur have been reported to occur in 30% to 90% of affected patients with coxa valga in ...

Last Updated: 29 Jun 2000

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Autologous Stem Cells in Achilles Tendinopathy
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Achilles Tendinitis, Right Leg; Achilles Tendinitis; Achilles Degeneration; Achilles Tendon Thickening; Tendinopathy; Achilles Tendinitis, Left Leg

 

Last Updated: 13 Feb 2014

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Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Surgical Trial
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Cervical Spondylosis With Myelopathy

 

Last Updated: 25 Mar 2015

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Baxter: Actifuse SHAPE vs DBX in ACC
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Cervical Spine Degenerative Disease Nos; Cervical Spondylosis With Myelopathy

 

Last Updated: 3 Dec 2013

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