Episodic Ataxias

Common Name(s)

Episodic Ataxias, Episodic ataxia

Episodic ataxia refers to a group of related conditions that affect the nervous system and cause problems with movement. It is characterized by episodes of poor coordination and balance (ataxia). During these episodes, many people also experience dizziness (vertigo), nausea and vomiting, migraine headaches, blurred or double vision, slurred speech, and ringing in the ears (tinnitus). Seizures, muscle weakness, and paralysis affecting one side of the body (hemiplegia) may also occur during attacks. Episodes of ataxia and other symptoms can begin anytime from early childhood to adulthood, with the frequency of attacks ranging from several per day to one or two per year.

There are at least seven types of episodic ataxia, designated type 1 through type 7, which are distinguished by their signs and symptoms, age of onset, length of attacks, and, when known, genetic cause. Only types 1 and 2 have been identified in more than one family; episodic ataxia type 2 is the most common form of the condition.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Episodic Ataxias" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Episodic Ataxias" returned 1 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

A randomized trial of 4-aminopyridine in EA2 and related familial episodic ataxias.
 

Author(s): M Strupp, R Kalla, J Claassen, C Adrion, U Mansmann, T Klopstock, T Freilinger, H Neugebauer, R Spiegel, M Dichgans, F Lehmann-Horn, K Jurkat-Rott, T Brandt, J C Jen, K Jahn

Journal: Neurology. 2011 Jul;77(3):269-75.

 

The therapeutic effects of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial in 10 subjects with familial episodic ataxia with nystagmus.

Last Updated: 19 Jul 2011

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Episodic Ataxias" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Primary episodic ataxias: diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.
 

Author(s): J C Jen, T D Graves, E J Hess, M G Hanna, R C Griggs, R W Baloh,

Journal: Brain. 2007 Oct;130(Pt 10):2484-93.

 

Primary episodic ataxias are autosomal dominant channelopathies that manifest as attacks of imbalance and incoordination. Mutations in two genes, KCNA1 and CACNA1A, cause the best characterized and account for the majority of identified cases of episodic ataxia. We summarize current ...

Last Updated: 27 Sep 2007

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[Episodic ataxias].
 

Author(s): Antje Herrmann, Geir J Braathen, Michael Bjørn Russell

Journal: Tidsskr. Nor. Laegeforen.. 2005 Aug;125(15):2005-7.

 

Episodic ataxias (EAs) exist in sporadic and familial forms. They have considerable genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Better understanding of the disorders will hopefully improve management.

Last Updated: 15 Aug 2005

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.