Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

Common Name(s)

Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare autoimmune disorder that causes the skin to blister in response to minor injury. Common areas of blistering include the hands, feet, knees, elbows, and buttocks. It can also affect the mouth, nose, and eyes. Some affected people have other health problems such as Crohn's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, amyloidosis, or multiple myeloma. EBA is not inherited and usually occurs in adulthood. Treatment aims to protect the skin, stop the formation of blisters, and promote healing. Immunosuppressive drugs may be used to reduce the body's autoimmune response.
 

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita" returned 56 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Conditional depletion of mast cells has no impact on the severity of experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.
 

Author(s): Anika Kasprick, Xinhua Yu, Julia Scholten, Karin Hartmann, Hendri H Pas, Detlef Zillikens, Ralf J Ludwig, Frank Petersen

Journal: Eur. J. Immunol.. 2015 May;45(5):1462-70.

 

The role of mast cells (MCs) in autoimmunity is the matter of an intensive scientific debate. Based on observations in different MC-deficient mouse strains, MCs are considered as fundamental players in autoimmune diseases. However, most recent data suggest that the outcome of such ...

Last Updated: 8 May 2015

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Recombinant soluble CD32 suppresses disease progression in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.
 

Author(s): Hiroaki Iwata, Elena Pipi, Nicole Möckel, Peter Sondermann, Artem Vorobyev, Nina van Beek, Detlef Zillikens, Ralf J Ludwig

Journal: J. Invest. Dermatol.. 2015 Mar;135(3):916-9.

 

Last Updated: 10 Feb 2015

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Inflammatory epidermolysis bullosa acquisita effectively treated with minocycline.
 

Author(s): Kana Kawase, Yoko Oshitani, Yoko Mizutani, En Shu, Etsuko Fujine, Mariko Seishima

Journal: Acta Derm. Venereol.. 2014 Sep;94(5):615-6.

 

Last Updated: 18 Sep 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.
 

Author(s): Rishu Gupta, David T Woodley, Mei Chen

Journal: Clin. Dermatol.. ;30(1):60-9.

 

Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare, acquired, chronic subepidermal bullous disease of the skin and mucosa characterized by autoantibodies to type VII collagen (C7) structures, a major component of anchoring fibrils, which attach the epidermis to the dermis. EBA patients ...

Last Updated: 5 Dec 2011

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Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: autoimmunity to anchoring fibril collagen.
 

Author(s): Mei Chen, Gene H Kim, Lori Prakash, David T Woodley

Journal: Autoimmunity. 2012 Feb;45(1):91-101.

 

Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare and acquired autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease of skin and mucosa. EBA includes various distinct clinical manifestations resembling genetic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB), Bullous pemphigus, Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid, ...

Last Updated: 30 Jan 2012

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

 

Last Updated: 11 Jun 2014

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