Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis

Common Name(s)

Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis associated with a high risk of skin cancer ({14:Ramoz et al., 2000}). EV results from an abnormal susceptibility to specific related human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and to the oncogenic potential of some of them, mainly HPV5. Infection with EV-associated HPV leads to the early development of disseminated flat wart-like and pityriasis versicolor-like lesions. Patients are unable to reject their lesions, and cutaneous Bowen carcinomas in situ and invasive squamous cell carcinomas develop in about half of them, mainly on sun-exposed areas.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis" returned 66 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Expression of the epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated genes EVER1 and EVER2 is activated by exogenous DNA and inhibited by LMP1 oncoprotein from Epstein-Barr virus.
 

Author(s): Cecilia Frecha, S├ębastien A Chevalier, Patrick van Uden, Ivonne Rubio, Maha Siouda, Djamel Saidj, Camille Cohen, Patrick Lomonte, Rosita Accardi, Massimo Tommasino

Journal: J. Virol.. 2015 Jan;89(2):1461-7.

 

EVER1 and EVER2 are mutated in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients, who are susceptible to human betapapillomavirus (HPV) infection. It is unknown whether their products control the infection of other viruses. Here, we show that the expression of both genes in B cells is activated ...

Last Updated: 5 Jan 2015

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Compound heterozygous CORO1A mutations in siblings with a mucocutaneous-immunodeficiency syndrome of epidermodysplasia verruciformis-HPV, molluscum contagiosum and granulomatous tuberculoid leprosy.
 

Author(s): Asbjorg Stray-Pedersen, Emmanuelle Jouanguy, Amandine Crequer, Alison A Bertuch, Betty S Brown, Shalini N Jhangiani, Donna M Muzny, Tomasz Gambin, Hanne Sorte, Ghadir Sasa, Denise Metry, Judith Campbell, Marianna M Sockrider, Megan K Dishop, David M Scollard, Richard A Gibbs, Emily M Mace, Jordan S Orange, James R Lupski, Jean-Laurent Casanova, Lenora M Noroski

Journal: J. Clin. Immunol.. 2014 Oct;34(7):871-90.

 

Coronin-1A deficiency is a recently recognized autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in CORO1A (OMIM 605000) that results in T-cell lymphopenia and is classified as T(-)B(+)NK(+)severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Only two other CORO1A-kindred are known ...

Last Updated: 17 Sep 2014

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Two sisters reveal autosomal recessive inheritance of epidermodysplasia verruciformis: a case report.
 

Author(s): Rui Yoshida, Toshihiko Kato, Masahiko Kawase, Mariko Honda, Tsuyoshi Mitsuishi

Journal:

 

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis is a rare genodermatosis characterized by a unique susceptibility to cutaneous human papillomaviruses infection. Most patients show autosomal recessive patterns of inheritance.

Last Updated: 26 Jul 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis" returned 6 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis associated with HPV 10.
 

Author(s): Amir Zahir, Lauren Craig, Peter Rady, Stephen Tyring, Alison Ehrlich

Journal:

 

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, inherited dermatologic condition demonstrating an increased susceptibility to specific HPV genotypes, resulting in both benign and malignant skin lesions. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis lesions are frequently described as pityriasis ...

Last Updated: 11 Sep 2013

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Epidermodysplasia verruciformis in an HIV-infected man: a case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Amit Kaushal, Shane Silver, Ken Kasper, Alberto Severini, Sate Hamza, Yoav Keynan

Journal: Top Antivir Med. 2012 Dec;20(5):173-9.

 

Last Updated: 31 Jan 2013

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Epidermodysplasia verruciformis and susceptibility to HPV.
 

Author(s): Tejas Patel, L Katie Morrison, Peter Rady, Stephen Tyring

Journal: Dis. Markers. 2010 ;29(3-4):199-206.

 

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis has been addressed in depth in the recent literature despite its rarity. The disease is characterized by a persistence in human papillomavirus infections and development of cutaneous malignancies, usually happening more frequently and at a younger age ...

Last Updated: 23 Dec 2010

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.