Eosinophilic Fasciitis

Common Name(s)

Eosinophilic Fasciitis

Eosinophilic fasciitis is a very rare condition in which muscle tissue underneath the skin, called fascia, becomes swollen and thick. Rapid swelling can occur in the hands, arms, legs, and feet. People with this condition have a buildup of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the affected fascia and muscles. The exact cause of this condition is unknown. Fewer than 300 cases have been reported in the past 35 years. Eosinophilic fasciitis is similar in appearance to scleroderma but is not related.
 

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Eosinophilic Fasciitis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Eosinophilic Fasciitis" returned 40 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Generalized morphea developing in a patient previously affected with eosinophilic fasciitis.
 

Author(s): Resham J Vasani, Sudhir V Medhekar

Journal: Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol. ;78(5):654-6.

 

Last Updated: 10 Sep 2012

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Eosinophilic fasciitis: what matters in management in a developing country--a case report with two and a half-year follow-up.
 

Author(s): M Nazrul Islam, M Ariful Islam, Syed Jamil Abdal, Mohammad Abul Kalam Azad, Abul Khair Ahmedullah, Syed Atiqul Haq

Journal: J Health Popul Nutr. 2012 Mar;30(1):117-20.

 

Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon disorder of unknown aetiology and poorly-understood pathogenesis. Since 1974, over 250 cases of eosinophilic fasciitis have been reported worldwide. The first case of eosinophilic fasciitis from Bangladesh is reported here. The challenges of diagnosis, ...

Last Updated: 24 Apr 2012

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[Multiple mononeuritis and eosinophilic fasciitis in a patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome].
 

Author(s): José Manuel Pardal-Fernández, Lourdes Sáez-Méndez, María Rodríguez-Vázquez, Begoña Godes-Medrano, Luis Iñíguez-De Onzoño

Journal: Rev Neurol. 2012 Jan;54(2):100-4.

 

Hypereosinophilic syndrome is produced by what is usually a multiple infiltration of eosinophils into tissues, and may be secondary or idiopathic, depending on whether it is related to a specific aetiology or not. It is not uncommon for it to include nerve disease, but it is unusual ...

Last Updated: 11 Jan 2012

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Eosinophilic Fasciitis" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Mixed connective tissue disease, overlap syndromes, and eosinophilic fasciitis.
 

Author(s): P J Maddison

Journal: Ann. Rheum. Dis.. 1991 Nov;50 Suppl 4():887-93.

 

Last Updated: 22 Jan 1992

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 17 Jun 2014

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