Enterobiasis

Common Name(s)

Enterobiasis

Enterobiasis is a pinworm infection of the large intestine caused by Enterobiasis vernicularis. This is the most common worm infection in the United States. During the night, the female worms can move outside the body through the anus and lay eggs on an affected person’s skin. The pinworm eggs can then be transferred from the infected person’s skin to another person’s mouth, where they will hatch and grow in the colon. Pinworms typically grow in the colon for a month or two before the females begin to lay eggs. The eggs can survive for 2 to 3 weeks on non-biological surfaces, allowing for easy spread to other individuals. Humans are the only hosts of E. vernicularis, meaning that you can’t be infected from a pet or other environmental source. People most at risk for pinworm infection are kids, their caregivers, and institutionalized persons.

A person infected with pinworm will usually complain of an itchy anus. Children will often present as frequently scratching this region. Other potential symptoms include sleep disturbances, stomach pain, and skin infections due to scratching of the anal region. In some cases, the female reproductive tract may also be infected. Diagnosis of a pinworm infection can be made by finding eggs around the anal region during the night. Clear tape is sometimes placed against the anus and then inspected under a microscope to look for eggs.

Medication is available for treatment of enterobiasis. Members of the same household are often all treated because of the high likelihood of the spread of infection. To prevent pinworm, proper hand and body hygiene is key. To get rid of eggs faster, showering in the morning and changing underwear often is recommended. If you have a pinworm infection, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Enterobiasis" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Enterobiasis" returned 23 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Demographic and clinical features of diagnosed individuals of enterobiasis in the southern Gran Canaria: sampling assessment].
 

Author(s): D Carrillo-Quintero, L Del Otero Sanz, S Hernández-Egido, A M Martín Sánchez

Journal: Rev Esp Quimioter. 2016 Dec;29(6):302-307.

 

Enterobius vermicularis, also known as pinworn, is the responsible agent for Human Enterobiasis. It is one of the most prevalent, but underrated, parasitic disease in children population. Diagnosis involves demonstration of either eggs or adult worms by Graham test. The aim of this ...

Last Updated: 7 Oct 2016

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Last Updated: 15 Jan 2015

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Enterobiasis and strongyloidiasis and associated co-infections and morbidity markers in infants, preschool- and school-aged children from rural coastal Tanzania: a cross-sectional study.
 

Author(s): Nahya Salim, Tobias Schindler, Ummi Abdul, Julian Rothen, Blaise Genton, Omar Lweno, Alisa S Mohammed, John Masimba, Denis Kwaba, Salim Abdulla, Marcel Tanner, Claudia Daubenberger, Stefanie Knopp

Journal:

 

There is a paucity of data pertaining to the epidemiology and public health impact of Enterobius vermicularis and Strongyloides stercoralis infections. We aimed to determine the extent of enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, and other helminth infections and their association with asymptomatic ...

Last Updated: 27 Apr 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Enterobiasis" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.