Dysphagia

Common Name(s)

Dysphagia

Dysphagia refers to difficulty swallowing, such as due to pain or increased effort. Dysphagia is classified based on whether there is a muscular, nerve, or structural problem. These could be due to trauma, neuromuscular disorders, hardening or tightening of skin and connective tissue, or swelling of nearby structures. Other structural problems include obstruction of the throat or esophagus. Functional dysphagia occurs when patients have trouble swallowing with no clear cause.

About 15 million Americans are affected by dysphagia, with about 1 million new diagnoses each year. About half of all Americans over the age of 60 will experience dysphagia. In addition to the causes described above, health conditions such as stroke, degenerative neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s Disease or ALS, and cancer of the head and neck can all cause dysphagia.

Not all affected individuals will recognize that they have dysphagia. Dysphagia is important to diagnose because it increases the risk of pneumonia due to the introduction of food, saliva, and nasal secretions to the airway. Additionally, dysphagia may lead to dehydration, malnutrition, and kidney failure. Symptoms of dysphagia include an inability to control food or saliva in the mouth, coughing, choking, difficulty starting to swallow, recurrent pneumonia, weight loss, wet voice after swallowing, and nasal regurgitation. In severe cases, individuals may be unable to swallow solid food and there may be pain when trying to swallow.

Treatments for dysphagia include surgery, medication, and feeding tubes. In addition, lifestyle changes such as regular exercise and diet modification may be suggested. If you are suffering from dysphagia, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Dysphagia" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Dysphagia" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

http://www.agmd-gimotility.org

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Dysphagia" returned 654 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

IMAGES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE. Dysphagia Lusoria.
 

Author(s): Bartosz Hudzik, Mariusz Gąsior

Journal: N. Engl. J. Med.. 2016 Jul;375(4):e4.

 

Last Updated: 28 Jul 2016

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Dysphagia in Acute Stroke: Incidence, Burden and Impact on Clinical Outcome.
 

Author(s): Marcel Arnold, Kai Liesirova, Anne Broeg-Morvay, Julia Meisterernst, Markus Schlager, Marie-Luise Mono, Marwan El-Koussy, Georg Kägi, Simon Jung, Hakan Sarikaya

Journal:

 

Reported frequency of post-stroke dysphagia in the literature is highly variable. In view of progress in stroke management, we aimed to assess the current burden of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke.

Last Updated: 11 Feb 2016

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[Reliability and validity of the Chinese Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) in evaluation of acute stroke patients with dysphagia].
 

Author(s): Rumi Wang, Xuehong Xiong, Changjie Zhang, Yongmei Fan

Journal: Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban. 2015 Dec;40(12):1391-9.

 

To study the reliability and validity of the Chinese Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) in evaluation of acute stroke patients with dysphagia.


Last Updated: 7 Jan 2016

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Dysphagia" returned 60 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Bedside diagnosis of dysphagia: a systematic review.
 

Author(s): John C O'Horo, Nicole Rogus-Pulia, Lisbeth Garcia-Arguello, JoAnne Robbins, Nasia Safdar

Journal: J Hosp Med. 2015 Apr;10(4):256-65.

 

Dysphagia is associated with aspiration, pneumonia, and malnutrition, but remains challenging to identify at the bedside. A variety of exam protocols and maneuvers are commonly used, but the efficacy of these maneuvers is highly variable. We conducted a comprehensive search of 7 databases, ...

Last Updated: 7 Apr 2015

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Fluoroscopic evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia: anatomic, technical, and common etiologic factors.
 

Author(s): Nasir M Jaffer, Edmund Ng, Frederick Wing-Fai Au, Catriona M Steele

Journal: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2015 Jan;204(1):49-58.

 

The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy of the upper gastrointestinal tract; review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx; provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia; ...

Last Updated: 25 Dec 2014

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Screening tools for dysphagia: a systematic review.
 

Author(s): Camila Lucia Etges, Betina Scheeren, Erissandra Gomes, Lisiane De Rosa Barbosa

Journal: Codas. ;26(5):343-9.

 

To perform a systematic review of screening instruments for dysphagia available in the literature.

Last Updated: 12 Nov 2014

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in Genetics Home Reference.

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Motor Learning in Dysphagia Rehabilitation
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Dysphagia; Swallowing Disorders; Deglutition Disorders; Stroke

 

Last Updated: 10 May 2016

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Incidence of Dysphagia in Intensive Care Patients With Tracheostomy
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Dysphagia; Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

 

Last Updated: 22 Aug 2016

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Dysphagia and Pneumonia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Dysphagia; Pneumonia

 

Last Updated: 31 Oct 2013

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