Cutaneous anthrax

Common Name(s)

Cutaneous anthrax

Cutaneous anthrax (Hide Porter’s Disease) is an anthrax infection on the skin. It is most commonly contracted when anthrax spores, specifically B. anthracis spores, enter the skin either through a cut or other openings. People who handle infected animals or contaminated animal products such as wool or hair are at the highest risk for developing cutaneous anthrax. Cutaneous anthrax usually takes 1-7 days to develop after skin exposure. Most often there is a concentrated dark black itchy center in the affected area surrounded by skin inflammation and blisters. Cutaneous anthrax infections usually do not cause pain and are rarely fatal if treated. The infection can be cured with antibiotics and affected individuals usually make a full recovery. The best preventative measure is to use caution when dealing with animals or animal products which may be contaminated with anthrax especially if you have any cuts or scrapes. If you or a family member has been diagnosed with cutaneous anthrax, talk with your doctor about the most current treatment options available. See also Anthrax.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Cutaneous anthrax" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Cutaneous anthrax" returned 43 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Two cases of human cutaneous anthrax in Bosnia and Herzegovina, September 2014.
 

Author(s): J Arapović, S Skočibusić, B Jelavić, H B Ivanković, M Jurić, D Mamić, S Grgić, J Lesko, M Leventić, I Soldo, J Ravlija, J Nikolić

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Last Updated: 27 Feb 2015

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Serum adenosine deaminase activity in cutaneous anthrax.
 

Author(s): Mahmut Sunnetcioglu, Sevdegul Karadas, Mehmet Aslan, Mehmet Resat Ceylan, Halit Demir, Mehmet Resit Oncu, Mustafa Kasım Karahocagil, Aysel Sunnetcioglu, Cenk Aypak

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Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity has been discovered in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data associated with cutaneous anthrax. The aim of this study was to investigate serum ADA activity in patients with cutaneous anthrax.

Last Updated: 7 Jul 2014

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Asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in patients with cutaneous anthrax: a laboratory analysis.
 

Author(s): Mahmut Sunnetcioglu, Zafer Mengeloglu, Ali Irfan Baran, Mustafa Karahocagil, Mehmet Tosun, Abdulkadir Kucukbayrak, Mehmet Resat Ceylan, Hayrettin Akdeniz, Cenk Aypak

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Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), the main endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, is considered to be associated with endothelial dysfunction. High ADMA levels have been shown to be related with disorders causing vascular inflammation such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, ...

Last Updated: 1 Apr 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Cutaneous anthrax" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Retrospective review of the case of cutaneous anthrax-malignant pustule from 1995 in 15-year old girl.
 

Author(s): Piotr Kajfasz, Michał Bartoszcze, Piotr Karol Borkowski, Wojciech Basiak

Journal: Przegl Epidemiol. 2014 ;68(4):657-9.

 

A 15-year-old girl was admitted to our Department with cutaneous lesion resembling black eschar. Anamnesis revealed that before getting ill she was wearing pullover made of rough sheep's wool and ornaments made of leather like straps. Cutaneous anthrax was confirmed by identification ...

Last Updated: 8 Apr 2015

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A case of cutaneous anthrax.
 

Author(s): N Natori

Journal: Tohoku J. Exp. Med.. 1995 Jul;176(3):187-90.

 

A 63-year-old man developed black crusts on the parietal scalp that showed mixed infections of dermatophytes and Bacillus anthracis on culture. The lesions improved with bifonazole, griseofulvin and bacampicillin hydrochloride. Although cutaneous anthrax is now a very rare disease, ...

Last Updated: 22 Feb 1996

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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