Cryoglobulinemia

Common Name(s)

Cryoglobulinemia

Cryoglobulinemia is a condition that can affect blood vessels throughout the body. This condition is caused by the presence of abnormal proteins in the blood called cryoglobulins. These abnormal proteins become solid in cold temperatures and block blood flow. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing, tiredness, glomerulonephritis, joint and muscle pain, purpura, Raynaud's phenomenon, skin ulcers, and skin death.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Cryoglobulinemia" for support, advocacy or research.

Alliance for Cryoglobulinemia

Alliance for Cryoglobulinemia is an inclusive network of patients, caregivers, family, medical professionals and other supporters dedicated to improving quality of life for people with cryoglobulinemia. Our goal is to create a platform that links all efforts of campaigns, research, support and other resources related to cryoglobulinemia. We utilize medical advisors, community networking, crowd-funding, peer to peer support, social media and campaign strategies to advocate awareness, patient support, education and research.

Last Updated: 27 May 2014

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Cryoglobulinemia" for support, advocacy or research.

Alliance for Cryoglobulinemia

Alliance for Cryoglobulinemia is an inclusive network of patients, caregivers, family, medical professionals and other supporters dedicated to improving quality of life for people with cryoglobulinemia. Our goal is to create a platform that links all efforts of campaigns, research, support and other resources related to cryoglobulinemia. We utilize medical advisors, community networking, crowd-funding, peer to peer support, social media and campaign strategies to advocate awareness, patient support, education and research.

http://allianceforcryo.org/

Last Updated: 27 May 2014

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Cryoglobulinemia" returned 141 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Enhanced activation of memory, but not naïve, B cells in chronic hepatitis C virus-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia and advanced liver fibrosis.
 

Author(s): Deanna M Santer, Mang M Ma, Darren Hockman, Abdolamir Landi, D Lorne J Tyrrell, Michael Houghton

Journal:

 

Mixed cryoglobulinemia is the most common extrahepatic disease manifestation of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, where immunoglobulins precipitate at low temperatures and cause symptoms such as vasculitis, glomerulonephritis and arthralgia. HCV-associated cryoglobulinemia ...

Last Updated: 10 Jul 2013

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Somatic hypermutations confer rheumatoid factor activity in hepatitis C virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia.
 

Author(s): Edgar D Charles, Michael I M Orloff, Eiko Nishiuchi, Svetlana Marukian, Charles M Rice, Lynn B Dustin

Journal: Arthritis Rheum.. 2013 Sep;65(9):2430-40.

 

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most frequent cause of mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), which is characterized by endothelial deposition of rheumatoid factor (RF)-containing immune complexes and end-organ vasculitis. MC is a lymphoproliferative disorder in which B cells express RF-like ...

Last Updated: 16 Sep 2013

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Role of microRNA profile modifications in hepatitis C virus-related mixed cryoglobulinemia.
 

Author(s): Elisa Fognani, Carlo Giannini, Alessia Piluso, Laura Gragnani, Monica Monti, Patrizio Caini, Jessica Ranieri, Teresa Urraro, Elisa Triboli, Giacomo Laffi, Anna Linda Zignego

Journal:

 

Hepatitis C virus infection is closely related to lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), including mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) and some lymphomas. Modification of the expression of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with different autoimmune diseases and/or LPDs. No data ...

Last Updated: 7 May 2013

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Cryoglobulinemia" returned 13 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Hepatitis C virus-related mixed cryoglobulinemia: is genetics to blame?
 

Author(s): Laura Gragnani, Elisa Fognani, Alessia Piluso, Anna Linda Zignego

Journal: World J. Gastroenterol.. 2013 Dec;19(47):8910-5.

 

Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is the extrahepatic manifestation most strictly correlated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection; it is a benign autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorder that evolves to lymphoma in 5%-10% of cases. MC is reputed to be a multistep and multifactorial ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 2013

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Molecular signatures of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII).
 

Author(s): Giuseppe Sautto, Nicasio Mancini, Massimo Clementi, Roberto Burioni

Journal:

 

The role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the induction of type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII) and the possible establishment of related lymphoproliferative disorders, such as B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), is well ascertained. However, the molecular pathways involved ...

Last Updated: 3 Dec 2012

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Rheumatoid factor, complement, and mixed cryoglobulinemia.
 

Author(s): Peter D Gorevic

Journal: Clin. Dev. Immunol.. 2012 ;2012():439018.

 

Low serum level of complement component 4 (C4) that occurs in mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) may be due to in vivo or ex vivo activation of complement by the classical pathway. Potential activators include monoclonal IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgG antibodies, and the complexing of the ...

Last Updated: 7 Sep 2012

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.