Acute Mountain Sickness

Common Name(s)

Acute Mountain Sickness

Acute mountain sickness is an illness caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes (usually above 8,000 feet or 2,400 meters). People at higher risk for acute mountain sickness are those who live at or near sea level and travel to a high altitude, or people who have had the illness before. The faster one climbs to a higher altitude, the more likely acute mountain sickness will occur. Signs and symptoms depend on the speed of ascension and the level of exertion, and can range from mild to life-threatening. Mild to moderate symptoms include difficulty sleeping, dizziness or light-headedness, fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, rapid pulse, and shortness of breath with exertion. Symptoms of more severe acute mountain sickness include blue color to the skin, chest tightness or congestion, confusion, cough, coughing up blood, decreased consciousness, gray or pale complexion, cannot walk in a straight line or walk at all, shortness of breath at rest, and death due to lung problems or brain swelling.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acute Mountain Sickness" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acute Mountain Sickness" returned 114 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Acute Mountain Sickness Symptoms Depend on Normobaric versus Hypobaric Hypoxia.
 

Author(s): Dana M DiPasquale, Gary E Strangman, N Stuart Harris, Stephen R Muza

Journal: Biomed Res Int. 2016 ;2016():6245609.

 

Acute mountain sickness (AMS), characterized by headache, nausea, fatigue, and dizziness when unacclimatized individuals rapidly ascend to high altitude, is exacerbated by exercise and can be disabling. Although AMS is observed in both normobaric (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH), recent ...

Last Updated: 16 Nov 2016

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Differences Between the "Chinese AMS Score" and the Lake Louise Score in the Diagnosis of Acute Mountain Sickness.
 

Author(s): Jialin Wu, Haoran Gu, Yongjun Luo

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 May;95(21):e3512.

 

The Chinese AMS score (CAS) is used in clinical medicine and research to diagnosis acute mountain sickness (AMS). However, the Lake Louise Score (LLS) is the well-accepted standard for diagnosing AMS. The difference between the CAS and LLS questionnaires is that the CAS considers ...

Last Updated: 27 May 2016

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Evidence for cerebral edema, cerebral perfusion, and intracranial pressure elevations in acute mountain sickness.
 

Author(s): Dana M DiPasquale, Stephen R Muza, Andrea M Gunn, Zhi Li, Quan Zhang, N Stuart Harris, Gary E Strangman

Journal:

 

We hypothesized that cerebral alterations in edema, perfusion, and/or intracranial pressure (ICP) are related to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS).

Last Updated: 21 Apr 2016

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acute Mountain Sickness" returned 14 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Pharmacology of acute mountain sickness: old drugs and newer thinking.
 

Author(s): Erik R Swenson

Journal: J. Appl. Physiol.. 2016 Jan;120(2):204-15.

 

Pharmacotherapy in acute mountain sickness (AMS) for the past half century has largely rested on the use of carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors, such as acetazolamide, and corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone. The benefits of CA inhibitors are thought to arise from their known ventilatory ...

Last Updated: 16 Jan 2016

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Pro: pulse oximetry is useful in predicting acute mountain sickness.
 

Author(s): Buddha Basnyat

Journal: High Alt. Med. Biol.. 2014 Dec;15(4):440-1.

 

Last Updated: 23 Dec 2014

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Non-high altitude methods for rapid screening of susceptibility to acute mountain sickness.
 

Author(s): Han Song, Tao Ke, Wen-Jing Luo, Jing-Yuan Chen

Journal:

 

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) refers to the cerebral abnormalities typically triggered by exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude. Although AMS is not often life threatening, it can seriously impact health quality and decrease productivity. Thus, detection of potential susceptibility ...

Last Updated: 15 Nov 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Comparison of Metoclopramide and Ibuprofen for the Treatment of Acute Mountain Sickness
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Mountain Sickness; High Altitude Headache

 

Last Updated: 12 Sep 2016

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Controlled Hyperventilation as Prophylaxis for Acute Mountain Sickness
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Altitude Sickness

 

Last Updated: 21 Nov 2016

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Inhaled Budesonide for Altitude Illness Prevention
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Altitude Sickness

 

Last Updated: 8 Dec 2016

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