Acute Mountain Sickness

Common Name(s)

Acute Mountain Sickness

Acute mountain sickness is an illness caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes (usually above 8,000 feet or 2,400 meters). People at higher risk for acute mountain sickness are those who live at or near sea level and travel to a high altitude, or people who have had the illness before. The faster one climbs to a higher altitude, the more likely acute mountain sickness will occur. Signs and symptoms depend on the speed of ascension and the level of exertion, and can range from mild to life-threatening. Mild to moderate symptoms include difficulty sleeping, dizziness or light-headedness, fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, rapid pulse, and shortness of breath with exertion. Symptoms of more severe acute mountain sickness include blue color to the skin, chest tightness or congestion, confusion, cough, coughing up blood, decreased consciousness, gray or pale complexion, cannot walk in a straight line or walk at all, shortness of breath at rest, and death due to lung problems or brain swelling.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acute Mountain Sickness" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acute Mountain Sickness" returned 92 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Inhaled budesonide and oral dexamethasone prevent acute mountain sickness.
 

Author(s): Cheng-Rong Zheng, Guo-Zhu Chen, Jie Yu, Jun Qin, Pan Song, Shi-Zhu Bian, Bai-Da Xu, Xu-Gang Tang, Yong-Tao Huang, Xiao Liang, Jie Yang, Lan Huang

Journal: Am. J. Med.. 2014 Oct;127(10):1001-1009.e2.

 

This double-blind, randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate inhaled budesonide and oral dexamethasone compared with placebo for their prophylactic efficacy against acute mountain sickness after acute high-altitude exposure.

Last Updated: 14 Oct 2014

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Prophylactic effect of erythropoietin injection to prevent acute mountain sickness: an open-label randomized controlled trial.
 

Author(s): Kyoung Heo, Joong Koo Kang, Chang Min Choi, Moo Song Lee, Kyoung Woo Noh, Soon Bae Kim

Journal: J. Korean Med. Sci.. 2014 Mar;29(3):416-22.

 

This study was performed to evaluate whether increasing hemoglobin before ascent by prophylactic erythropoietin injections prevents acute mountain sickness (AMS). This open-label, randomized, controlled trial involved 39 healthy volunteers with hemoglobin ≤ 15.5 g/dL who were divided ...

Last Updated: 11 Mar 2014

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Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.
 

Author(s): David P Hall, Ian J C MacCormick, Alex T Phythian-Adams, Nina M Rzechorzek, David Hope-Jones, Sorrel Cosens, Stewart Jackson, Matthew G D Bates, David J Collier, David A Hume, Thomas Freeman, A A Roger Thompson, John Kenneth Baillie

Journal:

 

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, ...

Last Updated: 27 Jan 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acute Mountain Sickness" returned 9 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Identifying the lowest effective dose of acetazolamide for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: systematic review and meta-analysis.
 

Author(s): Emma V Low, Anthony J Avery, Vaibhav Gupta, Angela Schedlbauer, Michael P W Grocott

Journal:

 

To assess the efficacy of three different daily doses of acetazolamide in the prevention of acute mountain sickness and to determine the lowest effective dose.

Last Updated: 19 Oct 2012

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Emerging concepts in acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral edema: from the molecular to the morphological.
 

Author(s): Damian Miles Bailey, Peter Bärtsch, Michael Knauth, Ralf W Baumgartner

Journal: Cell. Mol. Life Sci.. 2009 Nov;66(22):3583-94.

 

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a neurological disorder that typically affects mountaineers who ascend to high altitude. The symptoms have traditionally been ascribed to intracranial hypertension caused by extracellular vasogenic edematous brain swelling subsequent to mechanical ...

Last Updated: 21 Jan 2010

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Acute mountain sickness: medical problems associated with acute and subacute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia.
 

Author(s): C Clarke

Journal: Postgrad Med J. 2006 Nov;82(973):748-53.

 

This article summarises the medical problems of travel to altitudes above 3000 m. These are caused by chronic hypoxia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS), a self limiting common illness is almost part of normal acclimatisation--a transient condition lasting for several days. However, in ...

Last Updated: 13 Nov 2006

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Comparison of Metoclopramide and Ibuprofen for the Treatment of Acute Mountain Sickness
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Mountain Sickness; High Altitude Headache

 

Last Updated: 27 Jan 2012

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Training in Hypoxia to Prevent Acute Mountain Sickness
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Mountain Sickness; Healthy

 

Last Updated: 24 Jun 2010

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Hemodynamic Changes in Altitude Adaptation
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Mountain Sickness; High Altitude Pulmonary Edema; High Altitude Cerebral Edema

 

Last Updated: 2 Oct 2012

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